Mothering http://www.mothering.com/articles The Home for Natural Family Living Fri, 20 Jan 2017 22:06:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 The Home for Natural Family Living no The Home for Natural Family Living Mothering http://www.mothering.com/articles/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://www.mothering.com/articles These 4 Tips Will Get Your Kids to Clean Their Rooms http://www.mothering.com/articles/4-tips-helping-kids-clean-rooms/ http://www.mothering.com/articles/4-tips-helping-kids-clean-rooms/#comments Fri, 20 Jan 2017 17:03:49 +0000 http://www.mothering.com/articles/?p=180530 Here are the 4 tips to get your kid to clean their rooms, and keep them clean.

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Here are the 4 tips to get your kid to clean their rooms, and keep them clean.
I love my small house, but dealing with the clutter can be a challenge.

I have three children — ages 5, 9, and 10. Last Fall, I entered their bedrooms and became overwhelmed with the clutter. Their desk drawers were crammed with drawings, clothes were thrown on the floors, and toys peeked out from under their beds. I wanted to purge their bedrooms, but I also wanted to respect their space and belongings.

Standing in the middle of each of their rooms, it occurred to me: Without guidance, they perhaps were inadvertently picking up lessons I didn’t want to pass along to them — lessons of disorganization, lack of respect for their own belongings, and dare I say, hoarding!

I spent the afternoon removing the overload of crafts from their drawers, walls, and doors. I placed them in boxes in another room and wondered what their response would be, afraid they would feel I had invaded their space. I was surprised by their reactions — they were relieved! They each said to me, in their own way, that they had felt overwhelmed by the clutter in their rooms and they welcomed my guidance in getting organized.

For the next several weeks, I took time each day to help them declutter and reorganize their bedrooms. Then I created a plan to help keep their bedrooms orderly long-term.

Here are my 4 tips to get your kids to clean their rooms, and keep them clean:

1) Purge
Go through each drawer, desk, shelf, closet, and dresser top. Check for stuffed toys, knickknacks, clothes, drawings, crafts, and other items. Tell your children that they cannot keep everything due to a lack of space.

Explain that with so many items to store, some are hidden from view and often accidentally crumpled. Assure your children that they can keep what they absolutely love, but that the other toys, clothes, and items could be given to disadvantaged children. Take the drawings and crafts they want to keep and store them in keepsake boxes.

2) Organize
Organize things so they are easy to access. Since my kids are creative, I put up two cork boards on the walls of their rooms on which they can display their creations for any length of time. I also give them magnetic clips on the fridge for their artwork. I put some of their artwork in keepsake boxes when they feel it no longer has a place on their cork boards.

For knickknacks, you can create a wall of shallow shelves of varying heights for each of the kids to display their keepsakes and the small toys they hold dear to them. You can have a toy box in each room for stuffed animals, with each child getting to choose their dearest stuffed animals to be in their beds. Place family activities, like board games and outdoor toys, in a general storage closet.

I divide clothes: There are “good clothes” and “play clothes.” The good clothes, reserved for school and outings, are kept in their closets. The play clothes — former good clothes that have since acquired a stain — are kept in their dressers and worn around home. Each child is expected to fold and put away their own clean clothes, so if one of my daughters feels it’s easier to pick up her clothes by throwing them in the laundry basket than hanging them up, she still has to deal with it. It’s a natural consequence.

3) Pick Up Right Away
Once their rooms are purged and reorganized, it is important to maintain them. One of the key strategies to maintain a clean room is to have one activity out at a time, whether this be a collection of toys for a pretend game or crayons to draw a picture. Once a child is ready to transition to another activity, the first activity should be put away — every time, no exceptions. Bigger projects that simply can’t be finished before meal time can be kept on a child’s desk to be finished later. The child would need to finish that project before starting another one or doing another activity. This not only keeps the mess at a minimum, but also teaches my kids to prioritize activities and finish what they start. These are valuable life skills!

4) Gifts
The last challenge, one I’m still fine-tuning, is how to handle gifts. I’ve found that if my children receive ten gifts on their birthdays, there are only a couple they hold dear. They will play with all of them for a time, but long-term, only a couple will make the cut. So don’t give your children a lot of material gifts.

I still give my kids some material items, like a toy and a book, but I have replaced other gifts with things like tickets to one-on-one family activities, jewelry-making classes, hikes, movies, museums, etc. As a family, we’ve gone bowling, fishing, eating out at restaurants, and kite-flying. My kids love the change.

By following these four tips, my house is not only decluttered, but I also have more time to spend with my family.

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Study: Lack of Sleep Linked to Gestational Diabetes http://www.mothering.com/articles/lack-sleep-may-increase-risk-developing-gestational-diabetes/ http://www.mothering.com/articles/lack-sleep-may-increase-risk-developing-gestational-diabetes/#comments Fri, 20 Jan 2017 15:26:02 +0000 http://www.mothering.com/articles/?p=178026 Poor sleep quality may increase a mother’s risk of developing GDM.

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Poor sleep quality may increase a mother’s risk of developing GDM.

A new study has found that poor sleep quality, as well as sleeping less than six hours at night, may increase a mother’s risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

No mothering meme collection is complete without a jest referring to lack of sleep. Our hearts and our coffee cups are full soon after we stumble out of bed, right?

All jokes aside, scrimping on sleep can be quite detrimental to our health. Lack of sleep is associated with changes in metabolic and immune function, and is linked to an increased risk of developing many chronic health conditions, including Type II Diabetes, hypertension and obesity. Short-term sleep loss may also alter our beneficial gut flora and give us less time to spend in rapid eye movement sleep (REM), thereby throwing the hormones that regulate our appetite out of whack.

Lack of sleep may also make us more likely to display unethical behavior (I believe it), a trait we certainly do not wish for our children to inherit!

This new study, conducted in Singapore (apparently the most sleep deprived country in the world), examined the sleep patterns and glucose levels of 686 women. Sleep patterns were identified via a questionnaire and glucose levels were measured with oral glucose tolerance tests at 26 to 28 weeks of pregnancy. Statistical analysis was run (after adjusting for Body Mass Index and history of GDM) and it was determined that women sleeping seven to eight hours per night were less likely to be diagnosed with GDM. Similar results have previously been found in studies with pregnant Caucasian and African American women too.

I laughed to myself (and maybe cried a little) when I was told to get my rest and sleep as much as I could before my baby arrived. It was really hard to catch those Zzzzs with a big ol’ baby bump (former belly sleeper here), low back pain and waking up frequently to pee. Sometimes we just can’t sleep no matter how many sheep we count.

Here are some tips to help put you to sleep (hopefully not while reading this):

1. Set a Routine

Go to bed and wake up within the same 20-minute window every day.

2. No Naps

If you must take a cat nap, limit it to 30 minutes or less to avoid difficulty falling asleep at night.

3. Zen Out

If you find your mind is racing for more than 10 minutes once you get in bed, get up! Prepare a cup of hot bedtime tea (*it is recommended to avoid teas with valerian during pregnancy) and try meditating on something that is relaxing to you. Remember: This is not TV time!

4. Stretch Out

Before getting into bed try a slow, relaxing yoga routine.

5. Surround Yourself with Scent 

Several essential oils are known for relaxation and sleep, including (but not limited to) lavender, Roman chamomile and sandalwood. Try diffusing the oils in your bedroom, rubbing on your feet with a carrier oil, or spritzing a special blend on your pillow case.

6. Fuel with the Right Foods (and Drinks)

Avoid caffeine after 2 P.M. (remember, caffeine is in chocolate too!) and try to stick to less than 500 mg of caffeine per day (or less than 200 mg per day for pregnant women — equivalent to 12 oz. of coffee).

Avoid lots of sugar before bed as this may contribute to insomnia.

Eat foods rich in magnesium often, as a deficiency here is linked to sleep disruption (and possibly leg cramps!). Good sources include almonds, cashews, spinach, black beans, pumpkins seeds, avocado and yogurt. You may wish to talk to your health care provider about supplementation with magnesium.

To avoid hunger pangs during the night, have a snack with both a complex carbohydrate (ex. fresh fruit) and some fat and/or protein (ex. cheese) a few hours before bed. Avoid eating anything that may wreak havoc on your digestion, such as spicy or fried foods.

Other foods/beverages associated with pleasant sleep are tart cherry juice (which contains melatonin), milk, lettuce, walnuts and kiwi fruit.

7. Soak it Up

Research has shown that a drop in body temperature can help you feel sleepy. A good strategy for doing so is soaking in the bath a few hours before bed time.

8. Create a Cozy Environment

Remove any artificial lighting from your bedroom and be sure to keep the temperature comfortable (ideally less than 70 degrees F). Consider a soothing morning alarm (I like to use one of my favorite tunes) to avoid waking up frequently in negative anticipation of your screeching alarm clock.

Remember to discuss your sleep patterns with your healthcare provider, especially if they worsen. Insomnia may be hereditary and is linked with many other health concerns too. 

Photo Credit: Tamaki Sono/ Flicker.com

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Opinion: Trump’s Vaccine Panel Should Rely on Science, Not Conspiracy Theories http://www.mothering.com/articles/trumps-vaccine-panel-rely-science-not-conspiracy-theories/ http://www.mothering.com/articles/trumps-vaccine-panel-rely-science-not-conspiracy-theories/#comments Fri, 20 Jan 2017 14:59:40 +0000 http://www.mothering.com/articles/?p=178426 Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is not a doctor or scientist, so why is he heading up Trump’s potential vaccine safety commission?

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Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is not a doctor or scientist, so why is he heading up Trump’s potential vaccine safety commission?

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is not a doctor or scientist, so why is he heading up Trump’s potential vaccine safety commission?

The answer likely lies in whether Trump is sincere about his concerns over vaccine safety and why he still believes, despite a mountain of recent scientific research to the contrary, that there is a link between vaccines and autism. “Autism has become an epidemic,” Trump said during a 2015 primary debate. “It has gotten totally out of control. I am totally in favor of vaccines. But I want smaller doses over a longer period of time.”

Kennedy has expressed similar sentiments, writing in an op-ed that thimerosal, a mercury-containing preservative in vaccines, is a toxin linked to neurological disorders with studies that “strongly suggest” thimerosal directly causes autism. Kennedy also stated, “I am pro-vaccine, but I want safe vaccines, robust regulators and transparent science.”

Wanting safe vaccines and focusing resources on autism are certainly not a bad thing, but the issue of vaccines causing autism has largely been laid to rest. Though many initially had concerns over a link between the two, spurred mostly by a now-debunked and retracted study published in 1998, the vaccine-autism connection has since been thoroughly researched, with study after study showing no evidence of thimerosal causing autism, directly or indirectly.

Even parents who are concerned about vaccines for other reasons (Are there too many too soon? What about harmful side effects? Is a spaced out schedule safer?) should be looking to science and evidence-based medicine to answer these questions, not conspiracy theories. Though some would have us believe otherwise, science and facts are not the enemy. We want our kids to be as safe and healthy as possible, so shouldn’t we be asking those who are experts in the field of pediatric health for the best ways to ensure that they are?

Further, there are concerns that a proposed vaccine-autism commission under a fact-resistant, anti-science Trump administration may potentially cause harm to both vaccine safety and efficacy, as well as negatively affect autism research. It could end up diverting money and resources into studying something that has already been extensively studied instead of say, a possible safe alternative vaccination schedule.

Would it be taking a majority of funds for autism research and putting it into a debunked theory of causation instead of focusing on effective therapies for autistic children? What about using those resources to find help for families struggling with extra medical costs for autism therapies and support? What about the hundreds of thousands of young adults with autism that are aging out of these services, if they were lucky enough to have access to them in the first place?

Regardless of political views, or a personal stance on vaccinations, a commission to study vaccine safety and autism should be based on robust science and backed by the medical community; not anecdotes, hearsay, and wild extrapolations. Our children’s health is at stake. Whether Trump’s vaccine safety concerns are genuine, of course, depends on if the president-elect ever meant anything he said about creating such a vaccine panel at all.

Image via: Bill Smith

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Study: Prenatal Supplements Key to Growing Smart Kids http://www.mothering.com/articles/prenatal-supplements-key-growing-smart-kid/ http://www.mothering.com/articles/prenatal-supplements-key-growing-smart-kid/#comments Thu, 19 Jan 2017 19:44:49 +0000 http://www.mothering.com/articles/?p=181450 Study finds that prenatal multi-micronutrient supplements play a role in long-term cognitive development.

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Study finds that prenatal multi-micronutrient supplements play a role in long-term cognitive development.Prenatal multi-micronutrient supplements can add the equivalent of a year’s worth of schooling to a child’s long-term cognitive development according to a recent study.

The study, published by The Lancet Global Health, also found that a nurturing environment is more strongly linked than genetics to brain development, memory, fine motor dexterity, and general intellect.

The study was a follow-up to previous research on the effects of taking standard iron-folic acid supplements or multiple micronutrient (MMN) supplements during pregnancy, which are similar to prenatal multivitamins in countries like the United States and Canada.

Researchers tested nearly 3,000 Indonesian school children between the ages of nine and 12 whose mothers were part of the earlier study. The children of mothers who had taken the MMN had better procedural memory (important for learning new skills) in academic performance and in skills used in daily life such as: typing, driving, reading, math, language, and rules.

Researchers also found a link between cognitive ability and early life socio-environmental conditions like a positive home environment, happier mothers, and educated parents. The surprising part is how much stronger that link is than the one between cognitive ability and biological factors such as a mother’s nutritional status in pregnancy, premature birth, or a child’s nutritional status.

“With the new emphasis in public health going beyond saving lives toward fostering thriving children, these findings indicate the need to restructure front line health and development work to focus on family welfare and support for nurturing and stimulation, and helping future parents stay in school,” said Dr. Anuraj Shankar, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, senior author and co-Principal Investigator.

In the Indonesian province where the research was conducted, action is already being taken to bolster socio-environmental factors and programs that address elements of family nurturing, as well as supply populations with multiple micronutrients.

The study was funded by the Government of Canada through Grand Challenges Canada’s Saving Brains program.

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Viral Photo of Breastfeeding Bride Delivers a Strong Message http://www.mothering.com/articles/viral-photo-of-breastfeeding-bride-delivers-a-strong-message/ http://www.mothering.com/articles/viral-photo-of-breastfeeding-bride-delivers-a-strong-message/#comments Thu, 19 Jan 2017 14:54:56 +0000 http://www.mothering.com/articles/?p=181122 A bride posts a photo of herself breastfeeding her baby, and the Internet goes wild.

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A bride posts a photo of herself breastfeeding her baby, and the Internet goes wild.

In the photo, a woman breastfeeds her four-month-old son in her wedding dress. She has a confident and proud smile on her face. The caption reads:

“I would like to share my photo on your page of me breastfeeding my son on my wedding day. This picture is very important to me because at the age of 22 so many people doubted me and said I would give up on breastfeeding and here I am 4 months later and still going strong. I enjoy nursing my son and I made sure when I chose my wedding dress I would be able to nurse throughout my entire night. And I was able to. So I just want to share with women that no matter who doubts you or who turns their noses up to breastfeeding that it can be done. No one should make them feel embarrassed about feeding their child in the most natural way.”

The photo was shared on the Facebook page: Black Women Do Breastfeed. In a little over the week, it received nearly 5,000 likes and over 1,700 supportive comments. It has been shared over 29,000 times.

This is one of many breastfeeding photos that have gone viral in the past two years as celebrities like Alyssa Milano and Gwen Stefani, along with regular non-famous moms, share their images with pro-breastfeeding captions.

You may remember the photo of a photographer breastfeeding her baby in a public bathroom while her husband eats a plate of noodles in the stall next to her. The photo is captioned: “If you are not willing to eat your lunch in the bathroom then don’t expect me to feed my kid there!”

Another powerful photo to hit social media was of a mother feeding her baby in a restaurant while staring at something off-camera. She wrote: ”I’m staring into the eyes of a woman staring at me. She is looking at me with disgust and shaking her head with judgement in an attempt to shame me and indirectly tell me without words that I am wrong and need to cover myself.”

Breastfeeding is a natural act between mother and child. Until society perceives it as normal, women will continue to post their breastfeeding photos and supporters will continue to share them.

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This App Helps ‘Moms Pump Here’ http://www.mothering.com/articles/awesome-app-helps-moms-pump-here/ http://www.mothering.com/articles/awesome-app-helps-moms-pump-here/#comments Thu, 19 Jan 2017 14:51:54 +0000 http://www.mothering.com/articles/?p=180682 This cool app helps you find the closest nursing room.

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Moms Pump Here takes the hide-and-seek factor out of finding a clean, private, and quiet space to nurse when you’re far from home.

Hungry babies wait for no one. As a nursing mother, the last thing you want to do is waste time wandering around town in search of a safe, comfortable space to nurse or pump. That’s where the Moms Pump Here app comes in.

Developed by two mothers who describe themselves as die-hard breastfeeders and pumpers, the app is designed to make life a little easier for mothers on-the-go by helping them find the nearest space to breastfeed or pump comfortably.

The app’s database is comprised of more than 5,000 nursing rooms, breastfeeding pods, and breastfeeding-friendly spaces across North America and overseas. It was launched online in 2012, and as an app in Google Play and iTunes in 2015.

A nursing room is defined as a dedicated private room (not including bathrooms), shielded from public view and interruption. An example would be a breastfeeding pod, also developed by two nursing mothers. These pods have been finding their way into airports and other spaces across the United States, vaguely resembling small spaceships.

The creators of the Moms Pump Here app say that their products aim to raise visibility and awareness about breastfeeding. They believe that mothers should be able nurse wherever they choose without fearing judgment or shame.

Get the Moms Pump Here app for $1.39 on iTunes.

 

 

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CPSC Approves New Safety Standard for Sling Carriers http://www.mothering.com/articles/cpsc-approves-new-safety-standard-for-baby-sling-carriers/ http://www.mothering.com/articles/cpsc-approves-new-safety-standard-for-baby-sling-carriers/#comments Wed, 18 Jan 2017 17:44:40 +0000 http://www.mothering.com/articles/?p=179210 The CPSC has approved a new federal safety standard for sling carriers to prevent infant deaths and injuries.

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Introducing new safety standard for sling carriers to prevent infant deaths and injuries.The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has approved a new federal safety standard for sling carriers to prevent infant deaths and injuries.

Providing convenience and promoting infant development, the sling has become a household name among mothers. A sling allows you to carry your infant with ease, providing you and your baby with constant skin-to-skin contact. Whether you’re running errands or hiking a trail, you know your baby is comfortably nestled against your chest in tune with the rhythm of your body.

That said, sling carriers can be dangerous when not used properly. In 2010, the CPSC associated at least 14 infant deaths with sling-style carriers. Don Mays of Consumer Reports explains, “A very young infant’s head will be folded forward. That cuts off the airway, and they essentially suffocate. Another problem could be if the baby’s head could be nestled up against the carrier’s body.”

Some of the new federal safety requirements will demand that all sling carriers:

  • Maintain structural integrity — no seam separations, fabric tears or breakage.
  • Come with warning labels and visual instructions.
  • Carry up to three times the manufacturers’ maximum recommended weight.

For more information about the new safety standard, check out the CPSC announcement.

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Willow: The “Undercover” Smart Breast Pump http://www.mothering.com/articles/willow-the-undercover-smart-breast-pump/ http://www.mothering.com/articles/willow-the-undercover-smart-breast-pump/#comments Wed, 18 Jan 2017 15:03:52 +0000 http://www.mothering.com/articles/?p=179890 The Willow wearable breast pump is a cord-free, hands-free pump, and fits comfortably inside your bra.

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The Willow wearable breast pump is what every breastfeeding mother has been fantasizing about. It’s a cord-free, hands-free pump that fits comfortably inside your bra.

The company website shows women pushing strollers, working in the office, and chatting at the park — all looking chilled out and happy while they pump. If you are a breastfeeding mother, this is bigger news than the time we put a man on the moon.

The Willow breast pump fits inside your bra.

If you’ve ever heard the sound of a breast pump, you may assume that Willow sounds like a tank engine erupting out of your bra — not a good scenario if you’re in a meeting with your boss. But the makers of Willow promise that this pump is so quiet, ‘you can take that conference call without the mute button.’

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The pump looks like a vaguely breast-shaped, white plastic egg.  It collects milk in an internal spill-proof bag and shuts off automatically when the bag is full. It’s called a smart breast-pump because the accompanying app tracks milk supply, lets you know when it needs charging, and compares pump sessions. It’s easy to assemble (revolutionary in itself) and dishwasher safe.

Willow-breast-pump-5Magic like this comes at a price, retailing for $429 USD. The Willow breast pump is set to hit the market this spring.

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Mindful Practices: Show Your Gratitude Through Pictures http://www.mothering.com/articles/mindful-practices-gratitude-snapshots/ http://www.mothering.com/articles/mindful-practices-gratitude-snapshots/#comments Wed, 18 Jan 2017 15:01:01 +0000 http://www.mothering.com/articles/?p=178762 This is how one mom lives a happier and healthier life by practicing gratitude through photography.

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How to live a happier and healthier life by practicing gratitude through photography.
According to Harvard Health, gratitude is strongly associated with greater happiness.  Gratitude helps people feel positive emotions, relish good experiences, improve their health, deal with adversity, and build strong relationships.

We all have those moments, and sometimes even those days, that seem to demand more out of us than we can give. Those moments when we feel ourselves struggling in our roles as mothers and wives, weighed down by worries and responsibilities.

While undergoing difficulty, it is easy to overlook so much of the good that is present in our lives. Our patience can run thin, and our endurance to handle it all with a positive attitude may seem impossible.

Motherhood is punctuated with obstacles and challenges that we need to overcome. By paying mindful attention to simple things that bring us joy and creating the habit of practicing gratitude, we can make a positive difference in our overall well-being.

Scientists studying positive psychology found that a one-time act of thoughtful gratitude produced an immediate 10% increase in happiness and 35% reduction in depressive symptoms. The happy effects disappeared within three to six months showing that gratitude is an act that must be repeated again and again.

To practice gratitude in my life, I take gratitude snapshots.
Gratitude snapshotsSimply put, I take a lot of pictures.  I take pictures of my children; sunrises and sunsets; good food; dewdrops on leaves; flowers. I photograph anything that I see through the lens of my camera that hints simplicity, abundance and overall goodness.

I take these images and habitually upload them to my computer, and often post them on my blog or Instagram. When I need a positive boost or reminder of the happiest moments in my life, I look at the images. I smile, I laugh and yes, sometimes I cry, reflecting on all the good in my life.

My gratitude snapshots serve as reminders of all of the beauty in my life, especially on difficult days. This simple practice fills me with gratitude and evokes feelings of joy and love.

Consider making this practice a habit in your life. Tag your images #gratitudesnapshots, and we can create a community that celebrates the beautiful moments in our lives.

Image credits: Megan Devine

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Walking the Labyrinth of My Heart: A Book That Gives Hope to Bereaved Mothers http://www.mothering.com/articles/walking-labyrinth-heart-book-pregnancy-grief-loss/ http://www.mothering.com/articles/walking-labyrinth-heart-book-pregnancy-grief-loss/#comments Wed, 18 Jan 2017 14:59:08 +0000 http://www.mothering.com/articles/?p=177698 A book about the journey of pregnancy, grief and infant death, helping bereaved mothers turn suffering into hope.

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In her book, Dianna Vagianos Armentrout turns grief into hope.

Don’t pity the mother
whose child drinks Light
instead of mother’s milk.
-Dianna Vagianos Armentrout

Dianna Vagianos Armentrout has turned a personal tragedy into a story of immense hope in her book: Walking the Labyrinth of My Heart.

Parenting is one lesson after another in letting go. We let go of desired outcomes, anxieties, developmental stages, and control. This letting go is at once terrifying and freeing. Who will worry if not I?

Our worries span a great spectrum. For the most part, our troubles are manageable, but there’s always the fear that the worst could happen. But what does that mean? The worst?

For most, the worst means death: My baby might die.

Dianna’s baby, Mary Rose, did die.

Journaling and writing poetry throughout this dark time, Dianna has compiled her experience in her book, Walking the Labyrinth of My Heart.  Her message is one of deep connection through grief and love. She has turned a harrowing experience — the worst — into a healing tool for us all.

Dianna talks about going for a test to determine if there is a Trisomy in her baby’s chromosomes. The attendant tells her that five in every 100 babies have a Trisomy disorder. Though of course she hopes for a negative test result, she can’t help but imagine a room full of 100 babies. Looking at the babies, she asks herself a troubling question: Which are the five that won’t make it?

Her child turns out to be one of those five, diagnosed with Trisomy 18. Instead of looking at her daughter as a tragedy, an unfortunate circumstance, an unlucky pregnancy, she wants us to see her daughter as a person, one who fulfilled her own divine destiny.

“Your baby,” she tells us, “will do what your baby is coming to do.” Her own angel, Mary Rose, lived for one hour. Within that hour, she made a difference in the world, permanently changing the lives of the people around her.

Dianna speaks of the many personal and spiritual connections that gave words to her loss and cradled her soul. Her compilation of spiritual essays and poetry will help grieving mothers, and those who love and support them.

You can buy Walking the Labyrinth of My Heart on Amazon

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