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Mothering › Child Articles › Stay-at-Home Moms Worth $113,000 According to New Average

Stay-at-Home Moms Worth $113,000 According to New Average


Market Watch reported today that Salary.com has for the 12th consecutive year attempted to place a monetary value on the work moms do at home.


For stay-at-home moms, the site averaged that each woman handles an almost 95 hour work week worth nearly $113,000 per year. A working mom should add about $67,000 to her current salary for the nearly 58 hours she puts in at home. Work at home moms and fathers were not included in the report.


The numbers were collected from the information provided by more than 8,000 moms about the amount and type of work they do in their own homes, taking into consideration a variety of factors.


“The data really speaks for itself – a mother’s work is valuable and tangible,” said Abby Euler, general manager at Salary.com.


You can read Market Watch’s article here or take a look at the actual Salary.com calculator on their site.



Melanie Mayo-Laakso

About

Melanie Mayo-Laakso is the Content Manager for Mothering.com. Mothering is the birthplace of natural family living and attachment parenting. We celebrate the experience of parenthood as worthy of one's best efforts and are at once fierce advocates for children and gentle supporters of parents.


 

Comments (7)

And what about what working mothers are worth. I do all the stuff a SAHM does and I work. I don't get any days off because all my off time is taking care of family, running errands, cooking, cleaning, all the stuff my SAHD doesn't do.
" A working mom should add about $67,000 to her current salary for the nearly 58 hours she puts in at home." First of all, read the article. It does discuss working mothers. Second of all, why is it that everytime someone wants to discuss SAHMs, the working moms get all up in arms because they're not discussing them? It's ok for there to be an article about one or the other and not necessarily both, right?
All mothers bring value to their families-but working mothers' contribution is easier to quantify, because at the end of the week, there is a paycheck. SAHMs offer much to families, but it's very difficult to see what it is they are bringing to the family without that paycheck. Having someone write a post that helps to frame SAHMs in a way that families who are struggling under this economy will be able to relate to is appropriate. Thanks Mothering! Marcie
All mothers bring value to their families-but working mothers’ contribution is easier to quantify, because at the end of the week, there is a paycheck. SAHMs offer much to families, but it’s very difficult to see what it is they are bringing to the family without that paycheck. Having someone write a post that helps to frame SAHMs in a way that families who are struggling under this economy will be able to relate to is appropriate. Thanks Mothering! Marcie
" A working mom should add about $67,000 to her current salary for the nearly 58 hours she puts in at home." Not to worry - you were included. So if you work outside the home 40 hours a week + 58 hours, you are included in the over 95 hours of mother work. I've been a working mom, and a single working mom for many years before my current position. I used to feel very embittered (as it seems you do) about the statistical data on the seemingly easier way of a SAHM. While you may think you do all that a SAHM mom does, you do not. Your daycare provider likely potty trains your children, teaches them to eat with utensils, and provides support with motor functions and social development during the hours that you are at work. I did not realize this until I became a SAHM and a daycare provider. I now take care of seven children 50 hours a week and our 4 children the rest of the time. The magnanimous responsibility of constant care and training is much more stressful than my previous desk job. I am also paid far less (about $3/hr per child). Just my input, having been on both sides of the fence.
OH and btw...if your SAHD doesn't do all that you are doing after work...then maybe it's time he retire his position since he can't get that done. If one parent isn't working...then they should be the ones cleaning, cooking, laundry, school functions, running errands, shopping, paying bills...and the list goes on! So therefore, it is YOUR fault that he doesn't do that not ours!
That is also true. My husband (who is the one who works outside the home) insists on paying the bills himself. The rest I do myself.
Mothering › Child Articles › Stay-at-Home Moms Worth $113,000 According to New Average