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Posts by bronxmom

I am a fairly liberal parent and believe I err on the side of encouraging independence. In fact, my daughter (almost 13) is quite independent and will spend days and early evenings by herself.  However, I also question this arrangement. The question really isn't whether the 16 year old is capable of spending the night alone. Frankly, I think my daughter is likely "capable" of spending the night alone.  But most people of all ages need some kind of regular social...
You've had 2 babies in 2 years with tough pregnancies? And still night nursing a 10 month old and parenting a toddler? Wow!!! I guess I just wanted to say that you should go really easy on yourself - you're in a tough place.  That doesn't mean you don't need the exercise and it won't help a ton, but don't add beating yourself up for "making excuses".  You've got some good ones.   Some ideas: -I'd give up on the idea of a "routine" program like C25K; I feel like it...
I'm not a stepmom but raising my daughter with my partner and now our own son. One thing that sticks out from your post is a fear of having to give up the "single life" and put kids' needs ahead of your own prematurely. I would just look at it another way. This is an opportunity to ease into that lifestyle. If you only have your partner's son every other week, use the alternate week to do things that cement your relationship and give you time for each other. You are...
I had my now 2 year old when my older daughter was a few months shy of 10 years old.  I LOVE the age gap - it's just been the most amazing thing. It makes such a difference that my daughter is independent enough to care for herself as necessary so I can focus on the baby.  At the same time, the baby's been portable enough largely to accomodate my daughter's needs - though we do rely on caregivers occassionally to do things just with my daughter. But the best thing is how...
How do you know the amount? I found mine and filed the form online to claim (old paycheck) but it doesn't say the amount I don't think.  Either that or I'm not looking in the right place.
I agree with StormBride.  My memory of what this was like as a kid was that the kids who did the sports, in particular, tended to be the popular crowd, tended to be cliqueish and often were mean. Not that all kids doing extra-curriculars are mean but I think we have to unpack what we mean by social skills.  Kids on teams and in sports may learn to navigate different people, learn to fit in, learn to get along.  They do not necessarily learn (though surely many do) how to...
My son will be 2 years old at the end of the month and I am reaching my limit with nursing. I nursed my daughter until she was almost 3 years old, but it was not nearly as intense as with my son. She was able to do nights away; she drank cow's milk; she'd go a day or days without nursing.  My son on the other hand still nurses like a baby, including at night. I actually don't really mind night nursing except when he nurses so long that I can't shift position (he'll nurse...
I think counseling might be helpful because it usually is and it sounds like you guys have some deep (not necessarily bad) issues.  If I had to guess, I'd imagine your husband is feeling like you and your oldest are still something of your own "unit" that have a special closeness that's separate from you and him and the youngers.  You and your oldest have a history and a relationship that predates your new family - you were a family on your own first.  I can imagine that...
I think teens should be in a position to decide their activities.  I also think that there is a lot of personal development and enrichment that is not about "activities". - e.g., my daughter is a writer and has written dozens of long stories.  She has no interest - at this point in her life - in writers' camp.  But it's still an activity - she just does it at home on her own time.  I also agree with the idea that kids deserve downtime and actually work harder/longer...
Okay, this is turning into a teen parenting thread but I think Smithie's point is highly debatable.  Of course, parents should step in in dangerous situations.  However, there's no obvious conclusion that his activity is dangerous in the sense that a "lay down the law/no discussion" approach is necessary.  It's the kind of slow slide/warning sign that could just as easily warrant lots of attention and discussion and help in figuring things out together.  I also don't buy...
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