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Posts by loraxc

An IPod still seems like an expensive and delicate thing to give a 7yo, to me (arent they at least $100?). She isn't a careful kid and tends towards spacey...she would be pretty likely to step on it, lose it, etc. If I thought she really desperately wanted one it might be different, but she isn't even into pop music (well, uh, we don't listen to the radio, either, except NPR). Mainly she just likes the idea of having a cool "device." She is allowed to use the computer,...
My kids aren't really very destructive, but DS did break a pane of glass in our French doors by chucking a toy car through it. Man, was that ever a PITA to fix. Other than that...gosh, I can't think of much. The carpet is trashed, but that was incremental. They drew on the walls more than once. DD cut her own hair. Oh, miniblinds. They have a thing about killing miniblinds. Catscradle, I think some of this is inborn (some kids just have this...impulse to destroy) and...
Yeah, I thought the iPad was a bit nuts! This was at camp, which was 7-13, so it was probably an older kid, but still. Anyway, yeah, you hear me. I don't want her to feel like the poor relation or the kids whose parents are zero fun. Maybe I need to think of ways to be more...safely zany or something. Fun surprises. Harmless goofiness. Occasional nutty rule-breaking. Like...what...having ice cream sundaes for dinner? Maybe something like that? I would love it if other...
We are relatively strict parents and limit a lot of things that kids tend to brag about to each other. For instance, DD does not have a video game system, an iPod, a TV in her room, an Ipad, handheld gaming system, etc. She does not watch TV really at all (a few movies). She does not eat many treats or get junk in her lunch. Her allowance is small and she goes to bed early (by necessity--she wakes up super early no matter what and shr really needs her sleep). We also live...
DS, 3: "I think it's cool how they made people have feet."
How exciting! My DD has been really into writing plays this summer and I can just imagine how thrilling she would find this at your DD's age.So yeah, we've been all about plays. DD is writing adaptations of a few Dr. Seuss books, her own play, and some stories as well. She and DS have also been performing excerpts from books for us. DS shares DD's phenomenal memory, so they are able to recite long excerpts easily. It's adorable, and I love that he is old enough to do this...
This seems more like a general homeschooling question to me--have you tried the HSing board?
I see what you're saying, but with all due respect (I mean that!), I think your experience is unusual, probably due both to the isolation you refer to and your own personality, which sounds even-keeled and easygoing and also perhaps more able to adapt to extremes. I found my DD very difficult as it was and I would really have indeed totally lost it if I had to to be in constant contact with her as you describe. It sounds like you did very well with it!--but I don't think...
I agree and disagree. While being aware of potential giftedness didn't really change anything about the activities I did with my kids, reading about it gave me a great deal of insight into DD's intense and often difficult personality as a toddler. The OP didn't mention this, so it may not be an issue (my son is probably gifted too but was waaaaay more easygoing), but if you find your child to be unusually intense and confusing behaviorally, you might benefit from reading...
There is no serious empirical evidence that occasional spells of sustained crying cause brain damage. None. I've looked at the anti-CIO stuff and really, it doesn't support this. If crying caused brain damage, colicky, sick, and high-needs babies would all grow up to be brain-damaged. Also, pediatricians would be far more concerned about crying in babies. I had a car crier, and I know, it's awful, but you can release this particular worry.
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