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Posts by WildKingdom

Low iron can't cause slow clotting. Low platelets (or platelet dysfunction), problems with clotting factors, or Vitamin K deficiency can.
After having chicken pox (or getting the vaccine) the virus remains in your body in the dorsal ganglia of the spinal column. As immunity decreases over time, the virus can be re-activated in the form of shingles. So, you can get shingles if you have had chicken pox, or the vaccine. Unfortunately, the incidence of shingles is increasing, likely due to the vaccine. There is less wild-type chicken pox around, so people are not getting any natural immune boosting. ...
"After the Hannah Poling case, the CDC was starting to look kind of silly. I wonder how they will approach this new and highly credible research." New and highly credible research? Did you read the abstract? If not, here it is: http://www.ageofautism.com/2008/05/pediatric-vacci.html This "research" has not been published. It is not peer-reviewed. It was presented at a poster session of a conference. It has an n=16, with 13 in the vaccine group and 3 in the...
WendyJoe: Here is the actual abstract with the data, since you seem to doubt its veracity (this study is the pre-vaccine era): Population-based studies of varicella complications. AU Guess HA; Broughton DD; Melton LJ 3rd; Kurland LT SO Pediatrics 1986 Oct;78(4 Pt 2):723-7. Population-based data on varicella complications are presented using information both from national sample surveys of hospitalizations and physician office visits and from reviews of medical...
I can't remember where I read it, but some recent research indicates that eczema may be due to a genetic defect in the skin's barrier function. This article postulates that the incidence of eczema is increasing because of people with this genetic defect having increased exposure to pollutants and detergents.
I've posted this information in a recent thread, with primary sources. Adults don't die from chicken pox per se, but they can die from the complications of it. One in 400 will develop pneumonia (which can not be treated with antibiotics, since it is viral). 30% of people who develop varicella pneumonia die from it. So, yes, adults do die from the complications of chicken pox.
Citations, as requested: Population-based studies of varicella complications. AU Guess HA; Broughton DD; Melton LJ 3rd; Kurland LT SO Pediatrics 1986 Oct;78(4 Pt 2):723-7. Population-based data on varicella complications are presented using information both from national sample surveys of hospitalizations and physician office visits and from reviews of medical records for all cases occurring within one community (Olmsted County, Minnesota) during a specified...
I guess it depends if you consider 1 in 400 rare. I don't.
Roxy- Chicken pox in adults really is much worse, it's not just a myth. It's not that the pox is bad, but the complications are quite severe. The most dangerous complication is varicella pneumonia. This is a viral pneumonia that 1 in 400 develop. It has a 30% mortality rate, which is HUGE. There is no treatment for varicella pneumonia other than supportive care (mechanical ventilation, etc), and hoping for the best.
This sounds like keratosis pilaris. You can look it up on WebMD or just google it. It is treated with a hydrating lotion with either lactic acid in it (Lac-Hydrin), or with a lotion with alpha-hydroxy acids. It's not hormonal, just due to really dry skin.
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