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Posts by LoveToBeMom

Quote: Originally Posted by AllyRae We also want to invite homeschool children to our montessori room starting in a few months. I'm so curious about this, too! It was ironic to read the last couple posts, b/c I just had an encounter yesterday where two separate people asked me a question about whether I'll be having other children at my son's homeschool. (Another person asked the same thing a couple months ago.) It made me feel as if...
All the responses have been interesting to read and really helpful. Thanks for contributing!
[QUOTE= So for us, it's a safety measure to keep it contained. Now the baby's montessori stuff is all over the house, and I do keep some of the montessori-based toys in the common area. But for the most part, it's all in one room.[/QUOTE] Safety...that is a GREAT point. I'm due with baby2 in September, so I'll have to start thinking about choking hazards again! Thank you!
"School Room"? We currently have no physical boundaries between "living areas" and "learning areas." However, as I look toward beginning more formal preschool this fall, (and the many more materials that will come with it...) I am thinking about designating a "school room." I like how, currently, we so fluidly intermingle living and learning, but I'm just not sure that I want our living room to be overtaken by materials! (...as beautiful as they are) So, I'm...
(Just re-posting so I can subscribe to this thread, b/c I forgot to do so with my previous post!)
Have you considered Montessori history? The "Montessori Teachers Collective" has posted an online (free!) list of lessons (for ages 6-9): http://www.moteaco.com/albums/history.html
I am preparing to homeschool my children, starting with my near-preschool-aged son. Currently, his activities are primarily on shelves in the living room, and then there are a few other little nooks around the house as well. I am wondering if we should have a designated "school room." Please tell me how you are set up and why, and any pros / cons you see. Right now, I enjoy his learning and activities happening in the midst of the rest of our daily lives, so...
Quote: Originally Posted by jenfl But.... how do you explain living vs non-living to a not-quite 3 year old? DH suggested "living things eat food and have babies". Add "and they grow," to your hubby's explanation, and that sounds like a good way to phrase it. At less-than-three, if she doesn't get it, she doesn't get it. Then just set it aside and try coming back to it in a few months. In the meantime, you can casually bring it up from time...
p.s. Of course if you wanted to do this activity without having to wait for materials to ship, you could print pictures of living and non-living things. HOWEVER, this is less attractive to the child, and of course in Montessori we should move from concrete objects first to abstract pictures/ideas later. IDEALLY, we would sort actual, alive things like a potted plant and a house cat for the "living" category! Perhaps this is possible in the homeschool environment,...
The Learning Store by Lakeview sells a huge variety of tiny objects, which are usually used for language but could be used for Living / Non-living as well. Simply gather a variety of objects representing living and non-living things. The child can sort these into two baskets, or on a labeled mat (with headings and a line down the center to divide), or two separate labeled mats... anything will do, as long as the child can place the two classifications in two clear...
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