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Posts by bodhitree

It's true that people disagree about this issue. For what it's worth, I've read that there are serious problems with the CDC's analysis. The Complete Patient blog would be the best place to look for more information on this, if you're interested. If nine million people in the US drink raw milk on a regular basis, the percentage who experience any problems is very, very low.   The problem with your definition of "rare" is that you're treating it as a subjective thing....
I agree that you have to be very careful about your source for raw milk. I have visited the farm ours comes from several times and asked quite a few questions about what steps our farmers take to keep the milk safe from contamination. Our farmers are extremely conscientious, and every time I've been to the farm everything has been very clean. They have earned my trust. I would never consume raw milk from a source that I don't know much about.   The problem with...
My DD also cannot tolerate pasteurized, homogenized milk but does fine with raw goat milk. It's true that pasteurization kills enzymes, but I think a bigger factor might be that the high heat of pasteurization denatures proteins in the milk, that is, it makes them into a different shape, which will affect how they interact with any other chemicals that they come in contact with. These denatured proteins will act differently in the body than the proteins in raw milk. I...
This has certainly been my experience. After trying whatever I could think of (short of CIO or other strategies that seemed cruel to me) my DD was still a bad sleeper. Now that she's getting close to three, she sleeps through or wakes up once most nights, but it has been a long, hard road to get here. Another feature of her personality that came factory-installed is that she is quite emotional and sensitive, far above the average (and I know right where she gets it from...
Okay, that makes sense. You would definitely fit in just fine in the group I'm part of. But you're probably right that it depends on the group. My group is pretty laid back, and to tell you the truth we don't spend much time talking about all these issues anyway. Mostly we just do fun stuff together and help each other out with stuff. But it is nice to at least know we have similar perspectives on a lot of issues.   For what it's worth, DH and I are also "authoritative...
You would fit right in with the Natural Parenting group I'm a part of, with the possible exception of not being pro-AP. You didn't say much about that, so I'm not too sure what you meant by it, but pretty much all the families in our group do prioritize cultivating a loving and responsive attachment with their children starting in infancy. If you don't plan to be very responsive to your infant's cries, for example, you would not fit in in our group. People would find it...
If you're going to be strict about it, lentils are out because they're legumes. Corn is supposed to be out because technically it's a grain. Starchy vegetables (like squash, sweet potatoes, and I guess beets?) depend on your overall state of health and activity level. If you're lean and active, more starch is fine. If you're looking to lose weight or are not active, less starch is better.   Now...that's the party line, but in practice, I think you have to figure out...
  I also want to put in a plug for our Natural Parenting meetup group. It's very active and has lots of great families, including plenty of military folks. We do all kinds of events, including playdates, mom's night out, potlucks, holiday craft parties, etc.    
Yep. DD and I are equal in terms of our worth as human beings, but not equal in terms of our abilities and capacity to make reasonable decisions. I want to have a respectful relationship with her, not an egalitarian one. And to me, part of respecting her is not treating her as though she is made of glass or is incapable of handling a few moments of "distress." Experiencing distress, learning how to cope with it, and learning lessons from situations where our actions...
My parents did their best to build our self esteem by praising us regularly and telling us how great we were, etc. For me, I do feel like it made me overly sensitive to external approval and disapproval. Reading the parts of "Unconditional Parenting" where he talks about what happens when you over-praise kids was like reading my autobiography. That's just my experience, and it may be different for others, but that's why I choose not to do a lot of the "you're so smart!...
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