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Posts by Lollybrat

Hi! Are you familiar with Hyperlexia? Heperlexia is a form of autism that is characterized by the combination of very early reading and difficulties with verbal language. It is a different way of processing language. Children with Hyperlexia often have a distinct learning style and benefit from specific teaching strategies.My son with autism has Hyperlexia. He is 9 and just finished the 3rd grade. We have found that it has been very important for his teachers to have a...
  I agree with you, Linda.  I don't think there are clear lines in how you can categorize one form of autism another.  Even under the old system the division between autism, PDD-NOS, and Asperger's was fuzzy at best and was diagnosed differently by different doctors.    I also agree with you that an individual can be high functioning in some areas and low functioning in others.  We see this with DS.  Even at age 9, he certainly has some strong opinions about autism and at...
You should definitely ask the neurologist all of your questions and raise all of your concerns about an MRI.  Ask why they want it done, what they think they might find, how the results might change the treatment options, etc.   My son's issues are different.  A brain MRI was first recommended to us by one of his specialists just after he turned 6.  After talking with his developmental ped and our family doctor we decided to wait.  We just did the brain MRI in...
I haven't posted here in a long time, but I read here frequently.  We're pretty much a moderate AP/NFL family: more than most people we know offline, less than most people on MDC.  We do vaccinate.   My son is almost 9 and is up to date on his vaxes.  We are currently undecided about the HPV vax for him, but still have a couple of years to figure that out. He has autism.  He born with it, as well as with a couple of other genetic disorders.  We are pretty active in our...
  I've heard it said that autistic behavior is like "typical behavior on steroids".   It's not the presence of a particular behavior that is worry-some, it's more things like the duration, intensity, if the behavior interferes with the child's ability to function in the environment, etc.    My son had signs of autism from an early age, we just didn't realize it at the time. He didn't make eye contact with us even as an infant and would look at our mouths when we talked...
We used ABA/VB (Verbal Behavior, which is a distinct variation of ABA) when my son was a preschooler.  VB focuses a lot on natural settings, error-proof learning, and verbal language.  It worked very well for my son and he "learned how to learn"  with this method.  It was helpful for me because it follows a steady progression of skills and I was able to track his development with visual graphs. We also mixed in some Floor Time methods.   When DS started kindergarten,...
As others have said, this is a very personal choice.  You will find that parents of kids with ASD run the full gamut on this issue.   My son was born with autism, as well as a couple of other genetic disorders. We do vaccinate, mostly on schedule - a couple a little delayed.  He has never had an adverse reaction other than a mild fever and some tenderness at the injection site.  Vaccines have never set back his development in anyway.    We have a family history...
  I'm not sure what you mean by "start to get shots."  The CDC has issued an adult vaccination schedule since 2002 and reviews it/makes changes about once a year.  The link you provided is the most recent schedule for adults, but it's certainly not the first.   DH and I are both up to date on our vaccinations. DH is a volunteer firefighter/EMT, so his fire department requires him to be up to date and administers his vax as needed.  I have always made sure to stay up to...
  I think a ped neurologist is a good idea.  But I still think it would be helpful to rule out physical/structural causes first: things like muscle imbalance, retina/macula problems, optic nerve defects, etc.  A ped ophthalmologist can evaluate for these things.  The neuro might want to have this done to make sure all the eye structures are normal before doing any neurological evaluation/testing.
There are lots of different types of nystagmus, which are classified by things like how the eyes move (pendular, upbeat, downbeat, jerk, etc) and if it is constant or only occurs under certain conditions (such as head position, response to certain stimuli, etc).   Different forms of nystagmus caused by a lot of different things. Some causes include: neurological issues, vestibular issues, structural problem with the eyes, substance induced (medications or toxins),...
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