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Posts by sisteeesmama

I agree with a lot of what's already been said. We couldn't afford a new mattress, but we did find an organic futon pad for our futon and got one of those plastic zipper covers for our bed and then covered that with an organic mattress pad, organic sheets and an organic comforter that was synthetic materials mostly, because that's what we could afford. For her bottles I bought glass and then they started making BPA free bottles and I buy those now. For her formula I...
Ok, I really appreciate all of the great comments. Here is what I think I will try: I will remove the breakable/special ornaments that I would not want lost or smashed. I will tether the tree with some sort of fishing line situation. I will get out the littler tree that we have and find her some ornaments that she can put on and take off of it and have that be her tree to do with as she wishes. Thank you all for your input!
Quote: Originally Posted by mamazee 1. Barricade it off 2. Take it down and don't have a tree this year. It's too much temptation, and potentially dangerous. And do you really want to punish kids over a Christmas tree? Seems kind of Grinchy. I'd just take the tree down for this year. Or barricade the area off, if you have a good way to do that. I know, it seems grinchy to me too I did give her a time-out yesterday for yelling at...
While I appreciate your taking the time to respond, I just don't want to take the tree away, it would take away from our enjoyment of the holiday! I need to find a way to work with dd to teach her that some things are not for touching, and in my mind it's ok to enforce limits. I mean, lots of things are pretty, but they are not all for touching!
Could you skirt the issue with things like, "you sure are a great kid!" or "I sure do love you" "look at you taking initiative, that is SO great and helpful!" maybe I am missing the point and you already are saying things like this, but in my mind if she is asking for this kind of praise then why not give it to her, it's meeting a need, right? What about a simple, "high-five, my little awesome sweetie!"
DD is 2 and has seen Santa at the mall with my mom, on TV and in movies and in books at story time and really really likes the whole idea. She talks about him and asks about him and I am starting to rethink my whole position! I believed in Santa when I was little and my mom and Grandparents were into the whole thing, but when I started to doubt and asked my mom she continued to tell me he was real and never waivered and I felt lied to. I thought as a mom we would...
If you think your dc's behavior will be such that you will enjoy yourself and other will be able too, too, then I say bring him along. If he will really only distract you to the point where you aren't even enjoying the party then I say skip it and relax at home, no guilt! More than likely people will like seeing the little cute-y for a little while if you do bring him along!
In general, I don't want to tell dd 'no' about touching the ornaments on the tree, but I also don't want her to knock the whole thing over! Our tree was bought very cheaply and is not very well made, but it was the best I could do at the time and haven't felt it was worth it to replace it, it looks great decorated and that's good enough for me, except that dd wants to touch and fondle the tree and ornaments and beside the fact that a lot of them are old and made of glass,...
Quote: Originally Posted by ~pi My 3 yo is totally happy to get in the stroller partway into regular 7-10 mi walks with multiple playground stops along the way. He is also happy to get in the Ergo halfway through mountain hikes, despite being otherwise adamantly opposed to the idea. My experience: Get a child tired enough and that child will be happy to ride in whatever conveyance s/he is offered. I understand the no-stroller idea. We didn't even...
Quote: Originally Posted by StephandOwen Wow. So much judgement. My ds is 6 and still uses his jogging stroller sometimes. Why? Because he has autism and oftentimes it's near impossible for him to be out in public without having a meltdown. But, you know what? I still have to go shopping. I still have to live life. If having his stroller (and some books, his blankie and some noise blocking headphones) helps my son cope with life- why shouldn't I allow...
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