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Posts by tarahsolazy

I'm a doctor, a neonatologist. I work in a large university hospital, teach, do research, and care for patients. My work weeks can be 100 hours plus when I am "on service", ie taking care of patients. My non service weeks are typically 40-60, depending on call. Because I do ICU work, when I'm on call I frequently have to go in to the hospital, or stay there all night. Its not a phone call thing from home. I trained in the old days when there were no limits on work...
My son's name is Forrest, I don't know if that counts. But, its an established name, and not very common. I also think its pretty strong.
I think the dress-jacket combo would be great, based on what you've said. In my field, pediatrics, it runs the gamut for conference wear. There are always several women in skirt suits with hose and spike heels, lots in blouses or sweaters and nice pants, a few in more arty stuff, and some in jeans and tees. If you feel comfortable, you'll be confident and look great.
I review for medical journals, and mostly patient oriented or epidemiology research, and I do what Kate3 does, go section by section. I pay close attention to study design, subject selection, outcome definitions, etc. I typically review for journals that do it as an on-line form, with sections to write stuff. Maybe someone from your committee can email you reviews of papers they've written, or maybe you have some from your master's days. That was helpful to me when...
Quote: Originally Posted by captain crunchy I agree luckiestgirl. I don't think it is my child's responsibility to participate in what we believe is a lie you've (collective, not you lol) told your children. I won't encourage dd to just scream it from the rooftops but I am not going to place the responsibility on her shoulders of containing the lie either. This is my belief exactly. I have no interest in doing Santa. It feels uncomfortable to me...
Quote: Originally Posted by KayleeZoo Mamas, for those of you who got pg right after Mirena removal, do you mind sharing if these pregancies went to term or ended in MC? TIA I was pregnant within a week or so of having my first one removed, and that pregnancy went 41 weeks, ending in a healthy son. It did take me longer after my second Mirena was removed, which had been in longer, but when I did get pregnant, I had a healthy daughter at 39...
Neonatologist Breastfeeding Researcher (the RN's are out here representin'. Where are the other MDC MDs?)
I came out of undergrad with my BS with no debt, by working and some family help. Then I went to medical school, lol. It is impossible to work in med school if you want to get good grades, its 30 hours a week in class for two years, then 40-80 hour workweeks for the next two years. So I ended up with around $115, 000. The NIH is paying back about half of it for me, though. I think it was a good investment, now that I'm in practice.
My nursing days are over now, but I successfully nursed and pumped for both of my kids. My son nursed for 20 months, my daughter for 13. I work sometimes up to 90 hours per week, erratic overnights, and occasionally need to travel as well. I think my difficult schedule (I'm a neonatologist and researcher) altered my nursing relationship with my kids. I'm fairly philosophical about it, however, and happy with what I acheived. I never supplemented with formula, and that was...
I'm with you. My DS is 4, and I can't imagine sending him into the men's room alone for a few more years. I see it as other people's problem, as he and I are also in the same stall together, and its not like he's opening other women's stalls to look at them.
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