or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by PGTlatte

I also have a dysgraphic child.  Handwriting is part of the issue, but there are also issues with written expression.  But getting handwriting tolerable was a huge accomplishment.   I also had him learn to type, but I am not willing to let handwriting go.  My father struggled with writing anything by hand.  I don't want our son to struggle with writing by hand his entire life.    If your OT is using HWT, I will suggest a different program.  It is what got our DS to...
  I'm glad you have found a balance that is working for you and your son.  I am not an unschooler - I'm actually very structured and very much in charge, because that is what works here - but ITA about finding the delicate balance.  Minecraft is meaningful to our sons also, and taking it away completely would not work here either. 
  Really I find this very questionable.  I am very much in favor of traditional academic learning - it is what I am trying to do at home - but I found the school environment to be about as valuable as a prison term.   Although I suppose there is a bright side to everything....but really I think the environment and rules and how they are applied in many schools is very unhealthy...frankly I could use much stronger words than just "unhealthy".   My experience in college was...
He's really young.  For our son who is almost seven (but immature for his age), I keep his workload very light, with short work periods, with nice long breaks between each work period.  He has anxiety about making mistakes, so I give him unlimited help and encouragement.  He needs things to be completely positive right now and build up his confidence for doing school work.  I also bribe him with Minecraft time.  It helps him to have something he really likes to work...
Most HSers I know who are definitely "relaxed" consider what I do to be "school at home".    We do it at the kitchen table.   It is directed by me.  I use grade levels.   We start pretty early in the morning, fully dressed.  From 3rd grade on, there is written work produced for every subject (not every subject every day though).  Some days it does take from 8:30-3:30, and some days we are done at 12, depending on the pace of work, but it will usually all get done.  BTW,...
  This is what she asked - the part I bolded.  She has seen suggestions to let him learn on his own.    I stand by what I said -  it is not a good thing to fall into the idea that it is in any way harmful to explicitly teach reading.   If someone chooses to unschool - fine, whatever, your kid.  BUT I have seen mothers literally beside themselves over their kid not picking up on reading on their own, by age ten or so, with their hands mentally tied behind their backs,...
Visual perceptual problems can be treated somewhat by an OT, but best by a COVD developmental optometrist.  But be sure to ask specifically before you start with a COVD doctor if he/she diagnoses and treats the visual processing problems, not just the eye teaming problems.  Some of them only work on eye teaming and do not go on to visual processing, so they only get half the job done.   
Some kids will figure out reading with little instruction.  Some (I am guessing most) will not.    You should start the ball rolling either way.   Offer as much help as the child needs to continue making progress.  It's that simple.   Do not fall into the trap of an idea that there is anything wrong with providing a child with assistance and instruction in learning to read. 
For a child who is this young, I would watch a lot of Magic Schoolbus and Bill Nye DVDs, go on nature walks and identify local plants and birds, fry ice, catch steam and watch it condense, read about the planets, make dirt into mud and then let it dry back into dirt, sprout beans, play with magnets, get a good magnifying glass, mix baking soda and vinegar, etc.  I would save formal stuff for a few years later.
Leave the TV off.  Deschooling doesn't mean you give up being in charge.  Plan fun things to do and interesting places to visit.  Let the house be overrun with whatever they like to play with (here is it is minifigs and action figures of all sorts, different kinds of blocks, and access to music files). If a kid is asking to work on a subject, there is no reason not to.  Or maybe he would enjoy looking through the materials himself in advance of using them.  IMO a child...
New Posts  All Forums: