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Posts by PGTlatte

Yes, and it is also possible for a kid to have a great grasp of the concepts - they do understand numbers and the meaning of addition - but cannot efficiently move further into their math materials  because they have not developed fluency with the facts.  Both are important.   My son is one who struggled with fluency even with the 0 and 1 facts, just as he struggled with fluency with even the easiest phonics words and sight words.  He has visual processing challenges.  He...
Our son was not able to learn the addition facts when they were "jumped around" too much.  He needed to learn them in a methodical order.  Begin with only what you can do with 0, 1 and 2.  When that group of addition facts has been thoroughly practiced and completely memorized, introduce 3 and the facts you can make with that and all the other numbers that have been introduced already, practice those with all the other previously learned facts, then introduce 4, etc.  ...
Structured work at the kitchen table using lots of open-and-go materials.  But until age 8, not a lot of time doing this.  Our 6 yo K student does Reading Eggs, Horizons Math, D'Nealian handwriting, speech therapy practice and violin practice.  Our just turned 9 yo Grade 3 student does math, science, history and lots of different types of language arts work and spends 2-3 hours on it, some days more if he has a hard time getting it going.   He also does violin practice...
DS1 used to think he wanted to go to school.  Our neighbors' kids helped.  I pointed out to him how happy and excited the other kids were on the last day of school. Why ?  Because they don't like it !  I explained what school is like, and that shows like Sid the Science Kid are not showing the truth, because the grownups who make such shows are trying to convince kids to like school because generally they don't like it.  He spent a little time listening to neighbor kids...
A few ideas:   Listen to classical music - the Beethoven's Wig CDs are great, and the 2-CD set from classicsforkids: http://www.cinradio.org/store/   (I posted the link because it is hard to find)   Practice instruments   Read children's collections of Aesop's fables, mythology, classic fairy tales, Just So Stories, etc.  Stuff that gets the brain going.   Watch science DVDs.  Do experiments.   Paint with different types of things - sponges,...
I agree that the combined screen time limit doesn't make a lot of sense for homeschooled kids who use screens for school.  My kids spend some time using educational programs - Reading Eggs, Brainpop, etc, or watching DVDs - Letter Factory, Bill Nye, or Schelessinger videos.   IMO there is no way these are in the same category as mentally consuming games like Lego Star Wars or Minecraft or zoning out watching the Bey Blade show which they then obsess about.    I have...
  Being homeschooled certainly doesn't make gaming "healthier".   It still leads to the same problems.  IMO it can actually make it more of a problem, because you can have a homeschooled kid who already spends less time with other kids each day and has more free time each day to spend on gaming.  What I have seen in my own kids is wanting to rush through school work and then wanting to spend hours and hours on a game, and talk and think of nothing else and lose all other...
  Only developmental optometrists usually know anything about it.  There are optometrists and ophthalmologists who will say it "isn't real" and "doesn't work".  This is because they are ignorant about it.  It is not "do these exercises and throw away your glasses !"   It is physical therapy for the physical components of the eyes, and training for the entire visual system including the eyes and brain and how visual information is processed.  It is to get two eyes working...
Hi,   Our son has not been evaluated for dyslexia, but reading and writing has been a terrific struggle; he had major visual processing problems that have been successfully treated through vision therapy with a COVD optometrist, and he has a lot of the memory issues that seem to be common with dyslexia.  He does have a good memory for certain things, like details of things we did or places we went.  But his sequential memory is very low which causes him great...
OP, you mention that he is falling behind.  If you suspect any learning disabilities, I would get those checked out.  Our son needed vision therapy.  He had convergence insufficiency and some major visual processing problems that were not picked up by the "regular" optometrist who said "20/20, no problems".  Wrong.  An exam by a developmental optometrist found major issues there. Also if he hates handwriting there is the possibility of dysgraphia.  An OT can do an...
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