or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by mama2honu

I have tried Live - Ed and Christopherus.  Interestingly, many people claim Live Ed is more labor intensive than Christopherus, but I have found it really depends on your style of homeschooling.   Live Ed are like guides - but richly illustrated guides.  You are expected as a parent to prepare for and participate with your child - BUT every unit gives you stories, a song or a verse to match, a color illustration for EVERYTHING and resources for further exploration! ...
Christopherus had a sale in March this year - 10% off.  Basically free shipping.  
1)  Like Enki, the Live - Ed founders ask that purchasers do not resell their curriculum.    2) The curriculum is wonderful and the materials so clear and beautiful, I imagine many would wish to keep it and pass it down.   3)  I think it is worth every penny.  Especially for the illustrations and explanations on how to achieve them with your child at home.
Like new copies of both workbooks and textbooks to US edition Singapore Math grade 2A and 2B. 4 books total.  Retails for about $44. $27 including USPS media mail shipping USA.
Grade 2 Syllabus (includes Math, Animal Legends, Saints and Heroes) - $250 ALL texts are "like new" with clean pages. BUYER TO PAY SHIPPING, TBD on location. This program is very easy to implement and Donna's materials are mindful of the homeschooling home .
Second the Lighthouse Family series by Rylant.  Lovely and sweet.   We are currently reading Tal and His Marvelous Adventures with Noom-Zor-Noom and my 5 and 9 year olds are enthralled.  The book follows the adventures of a young boy, an old man and a talking donkey through an OZ-like land.  Meanwhile each chapter features a beautiful short story told by the old man to the boy to pass time along the way.   Swiss Family Robinson is also a hit.  Sadly the original...
Totally agree!  I had to leave one entire page empty because it just didn't apply.  I would be curious to see the results between children/families exposed to a lot of Disney versus children/families who aren't.   
I really feel for you, mama.  Here are some thoughts . . .   A one-teacher classroom is not really adequate to simultaneously a) artistically and thoroughly deliver a curriculum to a class while b) dividing their attention in dealing with the outbursts from emotionally disturbed children or serving the specific needs of others with special needs who often times interrupt said lesson.  And yet, sadly, I believe those children especially would benefit from a Waldorf...
I am considering purchasing some unit blocks for my family.  This sounds ridiculous, but I had no idea how overwhelming this would be.   Do any of you have a block collection?  If so how many is enough and how many is too many?  I have two boys that will need to work together, I am sure you get the picture.  Is a good set too bulky for a small home?   Also, if you have blocks, how often do your kiddos play with them?  I would hate to invest and have them sit...
I am laughing, because I am a Waldorf mama and my DS1 asked about cars with eyes when he was 3. He liked that they had eyes, and always asked about them. Well, I didn't want to buy them - ever. Why wouldn't he play with his charming wooden car? One day, he came home from a trip to the park with Dad with three "Cars" cars in his hands. He found them at the park, and the park was deserted. (please no lectures on taking them, I wasn't there ) But I'll be darned if he...
New Posts  All Forums: