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Posts by Diane B

PS Just wanted to add that a gifted program doesn't necessarily mean a bigger workload. Our daughter has LESS homework than last year. Her program really emphasizes the emotional and social needs of the gifted students,  and has a value that they need time out of school to develop these areas. Also, because they aren't doing "drill and kill" types of worksheets, etc. and because the kids grasp the material easily and are able to do a lot of independent work and study in...
I am the parent of a "non-quirky" kid who is socially adept, good at blending in, doesn't spend non-school time in academic pursuits generally…and is also highly gifted. In first grade, she was having a great time at school. By third grade, she was asking to go to a "special school" or be home schooled so she wouldn't be so bored. We put her in a program in a neighboring district for highly gifted kids and she's absolutely thriving.   As long as your daughter is enjoying...
W have a new system this fall for our nine year old that's working really well. We developed it with her cooperation and input. Each week, we issue her tickets, each of which is good for 15 minutes of screen time. She has enough tickets for a half hour on school days and 45 minutes each day on the weekend. We distinguish between using the ipad or computer as a tool (research for a school project, creating a book, drawing) and being passive (watching videos, playing games)....
I can't top the fabulous response you already got about Suzuki, but I can add my experience, my daughter started requesting to play the violin at age 2. We started her in group Suzuki lessons at 3.5. My daughter loved her styrofoam violin. It took her a good year and a half to play twinkle, and she enjoyed every step. It was not burdensome or irritating as a parent, but I think it's important to have appropriate expectations for the very slow pace that most three year olds...
My daughter started developing at 8, and we got her some comfortable, bra-like tops, just to get her used to them. It's her choice now, at age 9.5, whether she wants to wear a bra or not, but we talk honestly about how others might react to her nipples showing in an obvious way. Whether we like it or not, this is the world we live in. So she gets to make a choice, but hopefully, it's an informed choice. She's good about looking at an outfit and deciding how loose fitting...
I have a nine year old  - almost a tween. I'm on Mothering about once a month because it's so oriented towards babies and little kids. But yes, there are a whole different set of issues as kids get older. My daughter openly expresses sometimes that she doesn't like having two moms because it makes her different and she just wants a "normal family." We live in a completely queer friendly city, in a state that now has gay marriage, are totally relaxed and open AND she knows...
There are "find my phone" apps out there that might help her and you figure out where she left it. Also, there is a new plastic strip that you can attach to things like phones and purses and you can use another electronic device to locate them. Can't remember the name of it, but I'm sure there will be a lot of publicity when it comes out.   I was this child - lost everything constantly - and I was humiliated and shamed a lot by my dad for it. I turned out to be a fine...
Lock box. It's secure, easy, and you can tell her not to give the code to anyone, even her dad.
My nine year old shaved off half of her left eyebrow today. School starts in two weeks, it does look about as bad as it sounds as she has really dark hair and thick brows. I'm a little bit at a loss, as the last time I shaved or altered my body hair was over 25 years ago, and I don't wear or apply makeup. I would appreciate any suggestions about how to help her appearance until it grows back in. Thanks!
If it makes you feel better, I have heard someone ask a version of this question at just about every dharma talk I've ever hard on the subject of nonattachment/letting go/embracing the moment. I think we all have a lot of fear of what will happen if we abandon our habitual patterns of relating to the world. Actually, I find that when I am at my most open, my response to the situation in front of me is quite creative. Buddhism would not prescribe a particular response to...
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