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Posts by Cavy

Ta 4 replies, museums are free here actually but sadly none are convenient.  And he just won't go out, argh.  Wants to stay in his onesie all weekend.   I'll keep working on him.  Cheers.
I'm just sniffing around for tips. DS doesn't tick the boxes for any syndrome, but he is a right handful when upset about something (and he's easily upset about things). Talking too directly about his feelings only makes them far worse, so I have to talk around them a bit.  But still validate them, iyswim.   If you have an overly emotional child, what works for you?   Thanks in advance.
Tricky question, especially as I'm outside the USA so options limited, but just as a brainstorming session...   DS is not far off of 10yo now.  He has trouble socialising and tends to over-react to things emotionally.  He says he's bored on weekends but he's afraid of the other kids not liking him or getting bored anyway.  I was trying to think of something that would fit as a fun thing to do in our weekend time, totally failing!   Walks in the woods: boring Swimming:...
I may not articulate this well, but I am less worried about innocence/upsetting content then them simply not getting from a book what they could.   My kids didn't have the emotional maturity & life experience to get the most out of Harry Potter books until about the ages they were written for, which is to say age 10+.  That's apart from their intellectual level.   The first HP book is okay for most ages, it's charming & not too complicated.  My 8yo has read it....
ooh, I like your last point very much.  Not least because I think it will be the most convincing one I could put to her.  She mustn't make commitments that could end up being too much and then letting others down.  She did this with skipping violin last week, effectively, I'm sure her violin teacher was disappointed (DD is a bit of a star not because she's so great at violin but she's still got much further than most kids do purely from taking school lessons).   Yes...
DD is an all-rounder.  Good at sport and art and lots of academic things.  Enthusiastic.  As a result she's in demand, especially for anything competitive.   We were told that the Level 6 (higher ability) school exams conflicted with the camp trip for year 6s; luckily I figured out that the dates didn't conflict so DD was able to do both, otherwise she was begging to take the exams during her residential or at a school near to the camp.   She is off on a Latin...
That report is very dated for the UK, at least, I think it was written in 2005 so 8 yrs old already. Some of the things it says were never very true, anyway. Extracurric programmes?  Grade-skipping (not convinced necessary because differentiated teaching is the norm, but anyway): No, no no.   G&T in English schools is mostly an accounting exercise.
This once came up on another online forum (not UP, btw). I kept pressing pressing pressing, but What would you do if your child defied you? And they all had consequences in mind after all.  So to say they parented without needing consequences was untrue, they just did not have to resort to them very often.   I think some people have considerable powers of persuasion.  I have none and am generally immune to them too, so I am late to find out this exists or how...
Thanks for the info. :)
I figured it out (finally).  I needed to search for the terms "Extended day care" And "After school care" ("after school day care" or "After School Child Care" were the types of terms that failed.   This thread was very useful.   This link for SD.
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