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Posts by domesticidyll

It sounds like a math geek writing for a younger math geek--companionable.   This is such a good description--rings true for the tone of the book, and also for the problems themselves.
ETA, if you possibly can talk them into letting DS use AoPS instead of the curriculum, you'll have a fantastically math-rich kid. Not having to plow through the regular math might be pretty good incentive for working through AoPS :)
I think the pre-algebra book is fantastic. The problems are so thoughtful and rich. Many of the problems look tricky at first glance, but have a trick that makes them actually very simple--that piece is very rewarding for kids, I think. And the organization is so beautiful, the way the ideas build.   Another book that might work well for dabbling is Jacobs: Math, A Human Endeavor. Very different, chattier, lots of fun problems to play with. It is not as thorny...
(I've seen the potions done at a more mainstream event where kids just used lemon juice plus sugar plus water and make a tube full of lemonade, if this is not wholly a flobberworm mucus crowd :)     acramantula venom armadillo bile ashwinder eggs bezoar stones black beetle eyes dragon eyes fluxweed flobberworm mucus knotgrass lacewing fly powder peppermint pomegranate juice scurvy grass wolfsbane wormwood   I think we did baking powder for the lacewing...
We did a Harry Potter party a few years ago. Some of my favorite things:   make "potions"  I don't seem to have saved my list, but it had things like lemon juice as phoenix tears. Make sure to use an acid and a base. You can download a Harry Potter font online, and get inexpensive plastic vials with stoppers from amazon, and it is useful to have a wooden stand. You can have white labels and pens or calligraphy markers so kids can label their potions. (This was my kids'...
 Interesting on the difference among children! I admit I just assumed my younger one would be the same. Will be curious now to see. Oh, yes, absolutely, the feeling and recognition of deep learning can come from ballet or programming and so on. What I meant is that it's ideal if kids have at least intermittent experience with thoughtful academic work, too, if apart from the richness of going deeply in other pursuits there's a recognition of what real math looks like, for...
Just to add, my experience with an accelerated mathy kid has been that the leaps and lulls are both quite pronounced, and disconcerting.
My two cents is that there is a real value in having the experience as a child of doing at least some interesting and challenging academic work. Not at the expense of the art, music, sports, language, programming, but enough to build a sense of recognition--this is what it feels like to master something hard and interesting.   Here are a few that are good for dabbling, I think (stars for ones I think would be good for that age):   math history with exercises /...
Thank you all very much for the encouragement. DS just had his first official lesson, and we are both delighted with the teacher. A good fit for both of us. It was very helpful to have the encouragement to not settle for the convenient but not quite right (for us!) teacher.
 I just caught this on a second reading. I wonder whether her inexperience, 1, might be causing her to be very conscious of potential issues but without the experience to work from, and, 2, creating a more chaotic classroom environment where the transitions are especially hard. Or, 3, maybe focusing disciplinary strategy too much on consequences, which are not going to be helpful if the issues is a child having sensory difficulty rather than poor motivation. It sounds like...
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