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Posts by ma2two

Quote:   I guess they never stopped to think--if you expect everyone else around you to vaccinate for your child's safety, why would you be encouraging others to do their own research, which could lead them to stop vaccinating?   And it kind of makes you wonder--if they think not vaccinating is a luxury, why do they think their own kids don't deserve that luxury?
This is what the vaccine manufacturer, Sanofi Pasteur, says about the Tdap vaccine.   "It is unknown whether immunizing adolescents and adults against pertussis will reduce the risk of transmission to infants." http://www.vaccineplace.com/support/brochure/adacelpatientbrochure.pdf (page 5)
Quote: You can tell them that is not true. "Immunization records and/or an infant/child’s immunization status are in no way tied to the receipt of WIC benefits." http://www.fns.usda.gov/wic/benefitsandservices/immunization.HTM  
Quote: Nobody, not even your son's doctor, knows which vaccines, how many, and how close together your son can handle without problems.   Vaccinate him for the diseases you think are more dangerous than the vaccine. In your decision making, consider the chance of your son getting the disease (for example, nobody has caught polio in the U.S. since 1979).   California allows you to opt-out of all or some of the vaccines. You just sign the back of this form for school....
Something to keep in mind if you consider the DT vaccine without pertussis is that the only DT brand available in the United States, Sanofi Pasteur, contains 0.3 mcg mercury. http://www.fda.gov/downloads/BiologicsBloodVaccines/Vaccines/ApprovedProducts/UCM101500.pdf   Whether you get the DT or the DTaP in another country, please be extra sure that it does not come from a multi-dose vial, because then it would contain 25 mcg mercury.   You still seem more...
You said you wanted the pertussis component because of the new baby on the way, but then said you realize it is not effective against transmission. So I don't understand your reasoning.   I'm also not sure if you have weighed the benefits and risks of the tetanus component. Annually, there are only about 30 cases of tetanus in the United States, and it is extremely rare in children (most cases are in people over 40 and heroin users)....
Quote: I haven't dealt with that, but I would give them a copy of the law--probably the principal and then the district superintendent if the principal gave me any trouble. If that didn't work, I'd pay a lawyer to write a threatening letter. The law is clear and on your side, so worst case it shouldn't take more than one letter from a lawyer to get them to back down.    
PA allows for a philosophical exemption if the philosophical beliefs are a "strong moral or ethical conviction similar to a religious belief." http://www.pacode.com/secure/data/028/chapter23/s23.84.html
"15. What must a religious objection contain?  A religious objection must state that the objection to immunization is based on religious grounds.  Each objected immunization must be specified.  The objection must be in writing, signed by the child’s parent, and delivered to the school. There is no requirement of proof. The written religious objection must be resubmitted to the school each year.  16. Is there a philosophical objection allowed in Indiana?  No. ...
I wouldn't do that unless there were no legal exemption process or if I didn't think the exemption would be granted. I don't think you'd have any problem getting a religious exemption where you live.   Just to keep things simple, I've lied on camp forms where I knew they wouldn't be checking up on it and when no doctor's signature was required, but I wouldn't on school forms because that would require a fake signature and is a lie that you would have to continue and...
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