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Posts by SilverLace

My dd started going back and forth when she was 3.... and she was clingy, but only to me.  at that time she went two non-consecutive nights and they were set.  At 6 she started going 2 consecutive nights.  She is now 10 and still struggles with going there.  I really wish that her dad and I could've worked together more or been more creative to help her through it.  Had we helped her then I do not think she would be dealing with some of the grief and rigidity that she is...
This week I am going to have a long awaited meeting with my ex to change dd's schedule.  She currently goes two consecutive nights each week.  We are talking about changing to an every other weekend schedule, with some time (TBD) on the off week spent with her dad.   This is great because dd has never been happy (or even really neutral) about going to her dad's.   I am just wondering for others who have made this kind of change what kind of concessions (if any)...
  Nurses are not trained how to communicate with anyone.... in my nursing education we covered the basic of developmental stages and how to generally work with kids at different ages, but it was brief and didn't cover SN at all.   Maybe that is disappointing, but I think it's good that the nurses were asking you and involving you in your child's care.    
  Aphel- I am pursuing my RN for two reasons.  One, I learned a lot in my own midwifery education (which, like I said was a combination of college and apprenticeship) which lead me to value education which lead me to think that I might want to teach one day.... however, my BS in Midwifery is really a terminal degree that wouldn't allow me to do that (some might disagree because there are a couple of options for advanced degrees in midwifery but I have found that those...
  Ferra, I have been a CPM for years already..... I am getting my RN now for a variety of reasons... in part to work on this very issue.   I do think the issue of informed consent is a very important one.  And again, one that is very difficult to regulate or make consistent between providers (especially in relationship based care). 
I am glad this conversation is taking place.  I think transparency in all practices (medical and midwifery) is important.   I am also a CPM, and about to be an RN, and very interested personally in ensuring that 1) midwives are competent and 2) midwifery grows as a viable option (in and out of hospital).  Liz, I've read your story... and it is truly heart breaking.  In this post I am going to try to keep on topic of your original question and not speak to what I know...
My stepson has AS (and he's had surgery) and I am a nurse so my response comes from both of those experiences.   I think the best thing that can be done would be to work with the child life specialists ahead of time to make up a social story (with visuals) ahead of time that can be used and referred to before and during the experience.  Many child can adapt to the different ways adults explain things... but kids with AS will struggle with this.  It is important to...
My stepson with AS is nearly 12, and we have been discussing this issue for some time at our house.  I am also a mandated reported so I know this issue from the other side too.  Sadly, my step son has, at times, accused various people of "abusing him" when he gets overwhelmed or his sensory issues are really out of whack.  Luckily, this is a documented pattern with his therapist, but more than once we have wondered.  We have imagined how difficult it would be to explain...
I hear what the OP is saying.... I think it is a very hard (and important) topic to introduce.  Especially when the reality is, it is the people who are kids already know who hurt them the most.   I was really helped by reading "Protecting the Gift" by Gavin de Becker https://www.gavindebecker.com/resources/book/protecting_the_gift/   It helped me make the conversations with my DD more about her instincts and inherent abilities than making it about all the bad...
  It may be different where you are, but where we are our child could not get any services covered by insurance until he had a diagnosis.  Also, we did tell the school because it helped in our case, but that was totally voluntary and the school did their own assessment too.  Here a school assessment process cannot give a diagnosis, it can only identify areas of need.
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