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Posts by Ruthla

How are things going now?   My experience with starting homeschooling is that it was no extra work, compared with "dealing with school when it doesn't meet the child's needs." In fact, it was easier.
I'm still in the research phase of "finding a good curriculum to use next year for 7th grade." I've unschooled in the past, but it didn't work well for my son in 2nd grade, and now that I'm (most likely) pulling him out of school again, I feel the need for something more structured than I've done with him in the past. Unschooling worked great for my daughter (who will gladly read for hours) but he's a different person with a different learning style. I'm also considering...
I definitely DON'T want K-12 or anything quite that structured. That "all in one homeschooling" link doesn't look like a good fit for Jack's learning style (and i could do without the Christian references in the ELA selections and the science introduction.) I don't want to do "school at home." What I have in mind is a course that he can do online with fun, interactive lessons online for science and social studies, and then I'll find us some fun activities to do together...
For a wide variety of reasons, I've decided to keep my son in public school through the rest of 6th grade, but I'm very likely to homeschool him next year (and very likely for 8th grade as well, though we'll re-evaluate each year.)   Unschooling worked great for my daughter, but my son has a different personality and a different learning style and he needs something more structured. Not TOO structured- I don't want to re-create the problems of public school, nor do I...
I'm in the "college application" process with my 12th grader right now.  She's currently 17, but will be 18 before school begins. We live in New York State and she's going to a SUNY  (State University of New York) school.   I filled out all the  religious exemption forms for public school, but I'm not sure how to go about it now. Do I sign the form because she's not yet 18? Does she sign the form because she will be 18 before classes start? Do we both sign the form? Is...
"clean up your toys" is too vague. They need to be told "pick up the blocks and put them in the blocks box." When that's done, "pick up the dolls and doll clothes and put them in the doll box" etc etc. If that still isn't working, then they may simply have too many toys in circulation. Pack half of them away and rotate them.
(((HUGS))) Be gentle on yourself. It's OK to not be perfect or to "lose it" sometimes. But you need strategies to keep your son safe in public places. If he likes to run away from you in parking lots, then you need some kind of safety plan in place so that he can't run. Maybe he needs to be in a stroller, or to have one of those "leashes" on him, firmly fastened to him under his carseat so that he can't bolt the moment you unbuckle him. His physical safety needs to be...
It sounds to me like your ex made a VERY mature suggestion there- recognizing her own limits and realizing that she may not be the best person to provide stability for your daughter right now. I'm not sure if announcing it in front of your daughter was the best approach, but that's over and done with now. Ideally, the suggestion would have been made with just you and the counselor in the room, and your daughter NOT present, then suggested to her after working out the best...
You're the grown up. It sounds like you may be the only "real grown up" of the three of you, and you may find yourself setting limits with both of them, not just the preschooler.   Sometimes kids don't want to go with Mom, because they're having too much fun with Daddy/Grandma/babysitter/teacher. Don't take it personally. He's only 4. Just be firm about "it's time to come home now" just as your'e firm about "no more cookies before dinner" or "it's bedtime now." There...
If it doesn't pass with time, you may need to look at alternatives to this particular school. If he's feeling unsafe there, he might do better in a smaller classroom or to be homeschooled, where he can interact with other homeschooled kids in a more relaxed environment. But homeschooling isn't for every family, and he may do just fine after he's adjusted more.
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