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Posts by sleet76

We also use RightStart Math, like an earlier poster.  I was also going to suggest you name with tens, not by the "name" of the number.  So, there's 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, then 1-ten one (for 11), 1-ten two, 1-ten three........and you can continue this all the way to one hundred: 9-ten eight, 9-ten nine...   That may help her grasp the concept of the numbers, especially if you use manipulatives to demonstrate what you're saying.  Then, when she really gets it,...
Welcome to homeschooling!  My 6 yo DS has ADHD, and we homeschool, too.  I think it is a great fit for us, and we have a pretty relaxed outlook on things.  I'm glad to hear that K12 is working for you guys.  I think I would have a hard time using that with my DS--I would be spending too much of my goodwill getting him to do work that I likely wouldn't find necessary.  But, that is just us!  Keep in mind that so much of homeschooling is finding your own path, so if K12's...
Last year in WI, you could register your kids without a "grade", just with age and as an ungraded homeschooler.  I haven't looked at the form for this year, but if it hasn't changed, that would be an option.  I agree with the others that you should just put something down, if you have to pick a grade--he can be in "first grade" again next year again, too. 
My 8-yo DD is tiny, and wears a size 12.5 - 13.  She is still in slim 6 or slim 7, and is only about 46-47 lbs.  I am starting to wonder how small she may be as an adult!  All three of my kids are small for age.  DH and I are on the smaller side of average-ish  (5'8" for him, and 5'4" for me).  
I use my "planner" less like a planner, and more just as a record book.  I have a few curriculum things that we gradually and fairly casually work thorough over the year, and as we do something, I just jot it down on the date in the planner.  This leaves you lots of space to grow into a routine without forcing things, it's easy to see patterns of what is working, gives you lots of positive reinforcement in writing down the everyday learning opportunities to start...
Here is a link to one part of the Elementary section (part 2 of 3, I think)  http://www.eric.ed.gov:80/PDFS/ED430841.pdf     I bet the other parts can still be hunted up there if it looks like something you'd like.    
http://www.civnet.org/2009/01/crossroads-a-k-16-american-history-curriculum/   An overview, and then a link at the bottom to take you to the curriculum itself.  You need to google "Crossroads American History Curriculum" to have it pop up #1.
We also watched Liberty's Kids on Netflix, and my DD could totally follow along.  Many of the same minor historical figures were featured as were in the books we had read, and that was really exciting for DD.
Yes!  We are doing this.  I stumbled across Crossroads American History online, it is an older, free curriculum based around picture books for the younger kids, and gains complexity through the years--I believe it goes through college-level.  Not fancy--but has lots of book suggestions, and I have been very pleased with them.  I bought many of them used online through Abe Books or the like, and my daughter has been LOVING this.  I'll use the curriculum to teach it at out...
I think it was something like me describing her progress.  But I think they would work with you to give you the documentation you need, from my experience with them.  I think I only spoke to them once or twice a semester, and they were much more coming from the "how can we help you--is everything going well with you guys?" than "you have to do what we say".  Extremely laid-back, but flexible.  They support all styles of homeschooling, so I think they could be a great...
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