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Posts by Almi

http://www.unhinderedliving.com/dystocia.html   An interesting maneuver is described here for a baby with severe shoulder dystocia.  Which, it does sound pretty difficult to me.
Lol no.  I actually wasn't saying "we should do this" or "this would be better" at all.  I was just having a random thought and found it interesting to think about.  I didn't really have the time to go anywhere with it at the time.  What I was getting at is that perhaps serious shoulder dystocia is more prevalent than it "should" be.  That medical technology has actually possibly created a higher rate of medical problems.  My point with that is that unassisted childbirth...
  Obviously dystocias can't be completely prevented, but freedom of movement will certainly help, and apparently you still had your baby naturally...due to freedom of movement.  In my opinion, a dystocia that is a true emergency (where the mother has full freedom of movement) is very rare.  They become emergencies when you're laying on a delivery table with an epidural and whatever else they've pumped into you.   (On another note, thanks for sharing your story, as it is...
  I'm a list maker too, which is why I'm sharing with you how little I plan my births, lol.  Having a guide for your husband is great actually, I just wouldn't make it too detailed or anything.  You might end up with your husband greatly annoying you when all he's trying to do is fulfill your guide.  Of course if you don't mind him bothering you with things, that's different, but I know that when I'm in labor I'd just rather not be bothered with anything unless I ask.   I...
If there's one thing I've learned about labor and birth, it's that you cannot plan too many of the details of it.  I like to dream about my ideal birth, but I accept it probably won't happen exactly as I imagine it.  My husband's job during my labor/birth is to do whatever I tell him to at the moment.  :)
Oh wow that's expensive haha.  I have heard good ol' Krazy Glue works.  Check out the link I posted above, a few posts back.   I had vaginal and labial tears from my 4 lb nuchal hand baby, but I think I explained that above.  I don't think I tore with my last baby (8 lbs), but everything was...different.
Well, you have to do what's right for you.  Me, I don't need anyone to help me give birth physically or emotionally, but I did like my husband there so he could bring me whatever I wanted and I didn't have to move.  I'm a huge fan of unassisted birth, but I think it's good to have someone "on call" that's at least in the house that can assist you.   And yeah, that's the only reason I've wanted to invite friends over, is so they can help with the other kids and help...
Maybe it's because women tend to have bigger consecutive babies?  Though, my first baby was 4 lbs and my last 8 lbs...I didn't notice much of a difference between the two except I had to push harder for the bigger baby.  Lol.
I see.  I totally understand that.  A pregnant/birthing woman needs support.  If I were you I'd just be stubborn about it and tell your partner that if he's not going to support you, you're going to go and have that baby by yourself.  Tell him you know how to give birth and you know what's best for you.  Educate him.  Show him birth videos.     I know exactly what you mean by "feeling like a mother cat."  The first time I was in labor, I asked my brother to take his...
Hoping for an update...I've heard of a lot of cases where meconium was present and the mother/midwife wasn't concerned as long as the baby was fine and not showing signs of distress.   Here's an interesting birth story that involved thick meconium and ruptured membranes for several days.   http://www.unhinderedliving.com/intuition.html
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