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Posts by ChicoYaYa

My instinct would say to cut out all dairy for a minimum of 3 weeks. Then do a skin patch test overnight (put a dab of kefir on your wrist, let it dry, then check in the morning to see if you have had any type of reaction.) This will give you an idea if dairy is the culprit. When I was diagnosed gluten intolerant, I was surprised to receive a diagnosis of casein intolerance at the same time. After 3 years, I have been able to add cultured RAW dairy back into my diet...
I do not think JesKace is being over cautious... I might have a year ago, but that is when my external hard drive crashed, and now I have lost not just years, but decades of family photos that I had spent endless hours scanning. I think backing up either on the high quality DVDs or a secondary external is a smart idea.
Heating raw milk to higher than 110-112°F seems like defeating the purpose of using raw milk in the first place. If you are using fresh clean milk from a healthy source, there should be no reason to "kill off" any bad bacteria which would be the whole reason to heat the milk to 160, or at least that is my understanding. I started out using a commercial live-culture plain yogurt as my starter, and since then I just use 2 Tbsp. of my previous batch to make 1 quart of...
Maybe this is not really the answer you are looking for since we technically don't drink milk straight, but I make mine into yogurt and keifer and it stores longer. I have to consume my dairy cultured, so drinking it is not even something I consider. I first skim off a good deal of the cream for making into butter or ice cream and save that up in one quart jar, and then pour the rest into other quart jars (rinsed in hot water but I don't sterilize beyond running...
Wow, that's pretty steep for locally pasture-raised chicken. I pay $12 per at my local FM. But comparing it to "store-bought", just to see if you like it... I think that would be akin to comparing apples to oranges. And there is still the matter of antibiotics, hormones, and unethical as well as unsustainable farming to consider.
Lots of good suggestions here, but I am going to approach it as if it were me... so, here's what I would do, given your pantry list: Oven roast the 2 whole chickens with some salt and pepper as seasoning, probably put a quartered onion in the body cavity. Pull the meat off the bones and divide up for several menus (tacos, chicken soup, chicken and rice casserole come to mind), and throw the leftovers (including skin) into the crockpot with 2T apple cider vinegar and...
Why I started homeschooling: I didn't like the idea of my child being raised by the state institution. AND, It took me out of the home too much working (or stressed out by babysitting a houseful of kids) to be able to afford the tuition to send her to the local church school (which was almost as bad as the public school, in retrospect. Oh! The damage we had to undo!) Why I kept at it for 8 years: I/we loved the flexibility. We loved the reading in front of the...
almost $8.50 a half-gallon at the local health food store. anywhere from $7 to $10 a gallon, depending on the cow share. (that's just the actual milk cost. gas to pick it up, the annual board and care fee varies, depending on the farmer.)
I discovered a fascinating blog today... some of you may already be aware of it, but it was new to me, so I figured I would pass along the info in case anyone else might be interested in looking into it.   Kristin Michaelis (homeschool Mom, holistic nutrition coach, professional writer, and Real Food blogger) has created a curriculum geared to ages 12+, I think she is specifically targeting homeschoolers, but I'm thinking of several ways that this could be used in...
I was extremely pleased to find that, although I have been diagnosed casein intolerant, I have NONE of the horrible symptoms that I have had in the past now that I am eating homemade yogurt from raw milk, or a locally made raw milk cheese. This is a huge breakthrough for me. (Formerly I made my yogurt from powdered whole milk...) I never would have considered it until I learned that the pasteurization process actually "distorts" the casein molecule, and for me my body...
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