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Posts by FarmerBeth

I'd also make sure to have info and observations from any other adults in his life (school, daycare, sports, etc) and ask if there are any other professionals he or she feels it may be good for you to be referred to to help make the evaluation more clear.  Our developmental ped used a lot of info from the OT and a developmental psychologist and didn't make a final decision until all the info was in.  
We finally had my son on medication this year for anxiety and OCD this year at age 11.  With no other particular changes, he stopped having tics, he no longer has any academic adaptations and after years of not having a single friend (he's also on the spectrum) or a birthday invite, he has been visiting two friends, and has five friends coming over to his birthday to hang out and go fishing.  I have more regrets he wasn't on medication sooner.  It was very hard for him...
I think it would really help the whole family if you help your daughter find other teens in a similar situation.  I used to work with pregnant teens, and so many of them were able to finish education and have a healthy pregnancy and happy healthy babies, but with the support of others.  I'm in Canada, so a different health system, but I'm sure you could find access to a teen health centre, public health program with prenatal, family resource centre or something of the...
We are an hour away from a town and 15 minutes from a village of a couple of hundred people with one coffee shop, one small grocery, one library, one drugstore and one hardware store.  What we do so that we can save money on driving and still see "town stuff" once in a while is we plan the big grocery trip (the every two weeks at a cheaper than our local store type) as a multitasking to also enjoy some town stuff.  Same for appointments like eye doctor, dentist, etc.  We...
In your case, you won't be far from city resources or where you currently live, so I think you'll have a smoother transition than most.  I do have advice that you work on the infrastructure of your homestead from the beginning.  We kind of had everything going at once, and had livestock on the way while still building the barn, etc.  Get your orchards (and gardens) on the go on the new piece of land early on, as soon as all of the building plot is laid out, and even...
I'm very blunt, so please just take this as telling it as I see it and not trying to be mean.  It's your house, as a grown adult.  Shouldn't you just tell her that while she did a great job with you (if you care so much what she thinks, I'm guessing she must have been an OK Mom) but that you are a different person with different kids at a different time.  What worked for her isn't working for you.  That's why you're following through on getting your son help with therapy...
I think that this situation sounds horrible for the kids.  My nieces (biologically they are my DH's much younger first cousins) were split up when their mother died, but it was because the younger one had already been staying with my SIL and her cousins throughout her mother's illness, and the older sister, who is mildly autistic, was more comfortable in a quieter setting, with someone comfortable with finding her the specialized help she needs.  She's currently with my...
A lot of boys have this preference, I see it all the time working in the schools.  My non ASD son is also like this (the one on the spectrum will read fantasy and science fiction for hours).  What I find helps if you want a broader exposure to literature, is to use "bridge" books (like the Magic Tree House or Dinosaur Cove series) that are based in real science or history.  Also, realistic or autobiographical books like "Farmer Boy" that describe real work in a real life...
We struggled with the "different kid in different settings" issues with our DS (ASD) as well and I believe it's a large part of why he received a diagnoses at a late age.  Our son is very good with me, especially, and also much better with adults than other children.  The more we put him in situations where he had the strain of dealing with other people, and especially other children, the more apparent the social issues became.  One thing that really helped throughout all...
I think if you're feeling ready to kill him by the time the chores are done, you need to look at making sure he knows there are consequences for not having the chores done in a polite and timely manner.  The schedule and clear expectations will help, but if you are having to nag him through it all you need a little more.   One thing we found helped was (posted on the fridge like the chore list) an expectation that no screen time (computers, tv's, handhelds, you name it)...
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