or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by SympatheticDad

This really is a side-note, but I agree - you don't even have to get into the "whys" about what exactly the risks are.  It really does reduce to "There is a statistically measurable higher risk of mortality in post-term pregnancies."   See, for example, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23253109 ("However, postterm was found as a significant risk factor for labor complications and adverse perinatal outcome including perinatal mortality. Using a multivariable logistic...
  Anyone who has worked with, taken care of, or lost premature infants will tell you that, depending on how premature the infant in question is, this is potentially some pretty terrible advice.  The variance in the lung maturity of premature infants can vary widely even assuming no error in calculating gestational age - you can have identical twin preemies born and one of them will have a fine pair of lungs and one will not.  In such cases, requiring additional minutes to...
  The short answer is "no."   The longer answer is that as part of the contractions in the second stage of labor the blood vessels leading to the placenta begin to constrict, and after the fetus is expulsed this continues at a rapid pace.  The evidence on delayed cord clamping is mixed, and it might indeed have some health benefits, but nobody should think that it's an adequate substitute for the baby actually breathing.
  What helps mothers (and fathers) make intelligent decisions about birth is solid data, backed by statistical analysis.  It's not clear to me how statements like "some of those babies and mothers who are "saved" because they were in a hospital were only in danger in the first place because of the practices used in their hospital" moves the conversation forward in any way:  it's scare-mongering, and worse, scare-mongering that isn't backed by even a shred of data.  Here...
  Just noticed this.  TTTS also affects monochorionic, diamniotic ("mono-di") twins as well as "mono-mono" twins.  Not relevant to the original poster, I hope, but I wanted to make sure someone said that for the sake of future mothers looking for information.
The fact of the matter is, the moment you have been determined to have a twin pregnancy - especially a monozygotic pregnancy - your pregnancy is no longer "low risk".  Telling you that is not trying to "scare you" but is a cold and accurate description of the facts.  As the mother in a twin pregnancy, you have a fourfold risk of preeclampsia (source).  Intra-uterine growth restriction affects 5 - 10% of all pregnancies (source), but is twice as common in twin pregnancies...
From the peanut gallery, allow me to say that from my selfish perspective as a dad, any birth where you end up with a healthy baby and a healthy wife/partner is a smashing success.  Obviously, my intent here is not to invalidate your feelings, but just to give an outsider's view.  But, you feel how you feel, and you feel that way, in part, because of the propaganda.  Where did that propaganda come from? If you look into some of the rhetoric, what you will find is that...
The big concern here is whether Baby A is suffering from ogliohydramnios, which combined with Baby B's polyhydramnios would be an indicator for TTTS.  However, your MFM would certainly be looking for this, and the fact that she or he didn't raise it is a good sign.  Also, even if TTTS did develop, given that you're already at 27 weeks you'd be in comparatively good shape compared to early-onset TTTS.   My one comment is:  don't skip any ultrasound appointments.
That "anthrodoula" blog post is the most shameful sort of deceptive fearmongering.  How the author can sleep at night after telling such horrible lies to worried mommas is beyond me.   Specific lies that leapt off the page at me were her description of sonography as involving "radiation from ultrasound", which is clearly deceptive (as the National Institutes of Health say, "Ultrasound does not involve radiation, such as that used when taking an x-ray.")  One could...
I suggest visiting the TTTS foundation, which is a helpful resource:  http://tttsfoundation.org   Their "FAQ" on vaginal vs. caesarian delivery states:       My best advice to you, being part of a family that has undergone TTTS is:  find the absolute best medical care that you can, and stay flexible.  What makes TTTS a bear is the erratic speed at which it progresses (or doesn't).  Some fetuses can tolerate the syndrome for an extended period of time, with proper maternal...
New Posts  All Forums: