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Posts by SympatheticDad

I'm not going to speak for Dr. Amy, but I think some attitudes are being attributed to her that she may not have.  In Teen Skepchick's interview with her, she goes out of her way to say that if a mother knows the facts and still chooses home birth, she has no problem with it.  Her objection, as I understand it, is that she thinks that mothers are making decisions based on incomplete or inaccurate information.  The specific sentence I remember from the interview was along...
Any OB/GYN resident working in a busy teaching hospital will see 20 to 40 deliveries per week.  1000 babies in 5 years sounds perfectly plausible to me.   It's possible that this gap in experience between OB/GYNs and many homebirth midwives is part of where the gap in understanding comes from.  To someone who has only delivered 40 or 50 babies ever, a "1 in 500" chance might sound low.  To someone who has delivered a thousand babies, "1 in 500" translates directly to 2...
  No, but placentas do.  The risks of birth, including postpartum hemorrhage, increase after 40 weeks.  That doesn't mean one should panic, but it does mean that closely monitoring the pregnancy is appropriate.   Source: http://www.nature.com/jp/journal/v26/n9/full/7211560a.html  
Comfort and safety issues aside (obviously, if the mom doesn't want the kid at the birth, the kid shouldn't be there) I personally think most kids younger than puberty are going to have a lot of trouble processing what's going on during a birth.  Even the most optimistic birth scenario involves the person they love most in the entire world bleeding quite a bit and, probably, crying out in pain.  It seems really unfair to me to put a kid through that.     And god...
The phrase "identical twins" is in and of itself misleading.  As you've noticed, "identical" twins can look quite different.  We don't look the way we look just because of our genes, but also because of environmental factors -- to take just one example, the way the fetuses move around in the uterus can have significant effect on the shape of the child's head.   And any parent of "identical" twins can tell you that there are a hundred little visual differences that become...
OK, I'll be the bad guy here.  But please realize I am saying this out of respect and good-will.   As the mother-to-be of multiples, you are at greatly elevated risk of complications.  You need to acquaint yourself with the statistics and make an informed decision.  Speaking from brutal experience, mono-di twins have their own set of complexities (the most dire of which is twin-to-twin transfusion, but it doesn't stand alone - whenever two twins share a single...
  Doctors aren't magic, and hospitals aren't magic.  A lot of the support that makes modern medical technology effective at reducing neonatal mortality is the availability and more specifically the immediate avaliability of equipment, medicine, and staff trained in how to use both.  Speaking from experience, in the case of a distressed newborn, minutes spent in transport can be critical.   None of that invalidates homebirth as a choice for parents who understand their...
It's been three days and nobody has responded to your post.  So I registered an account to give you my opinion.   First off, I'm not a mom, and I'm not a woman.  I'm a dad.  So my perspective is no doubt incomplete.     I think it's OK to feel disappointed that things didn't go the way you envisioned them, but some outside perspective might be valuable here.  Historically, childbirth has been an inherently dangerous activity.  Even today, as we speak, there are...
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