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Posts by porcupine73

Hm....that sounds interesting! Do you scrape the mold off, or just eat it? I had some raw milk in a quart jar that I was trying to separate into curds and whey, and it did it, after about a week. But there was some orangish mold that formed on it, not a whole lot, and some bluish mold. Wasn't sure if that was still edible?   It's been on the counter now four about a month, and it is nice and separated into curds and whey, but the mold has grown a bit more though. (It...
Yes, SP does add synthetic vitamins to some of their products. For example, in that list above pyridoxine hydrochloride is a synthetic vitamin. The riboflavin is likely synthetic too since they do not list the natural form. The calcium stearate is a flow agent; they just happen to use calcium stearate instead of magnesium stearate like many other vitamin makers use. I'm using the SP Bio-Dent product right now.   Someone asked about other vitamins that contain organs....
Yes, clabbering is explained in Nourishing Traditions. Basically you just leave the milk sit at room temperature for 24 hours, then re-refrigerate. Some resources suggest it should be at 80F for 24 hours.   I'm not sure about clabber cheese, though. Do you just take the well clabbered milk and strain it through cheese cloth to get out the whey?
Right, some people keep raw milk a month of longer, and if it is just above freezing in the refrigerator, it may still even be sweet. Otherwise it will slowly start to sour as the lactose gets converted to lactic acid. But this is a good thing; rather than rot like pasteurized store 'milk', raw milk actually preserves itself. Some sources suggest though if it has started to sour quite a bit, that it should be left at 80F for 24 hours to fully clabber. I believe this is...
I haven't tried making butter yet, but the easiest ways I've seen online to do it are to let the cream separate to the top of the milk, then siphon that off (or use a cream separator, which is basically a large jar with a spout at the bottom, so you can pour off the milk portion until all that is left is cream). Then put the cream into a blender or food processor and whip it until the butter and buttermilk are formed. Then you put that into a wooden bowl and press it...
Some people tolerate it better if it is fermented, such as in kefir or buttermilk. Then much of the lactose gets converted to lactic acid, which makes it much easier for anyone who is lactose intolerant to consume.
I shake the cream in. Don't throw it out! Even if you didn't want to drink it, you can use it make excellent butter! I noticed a bit of a yellow color in some I just got, the lady said one of her cows had given birth recently and the milk was exceptionally rich in cream right now. mmmm good.   I usually drink it cultured, as clabber, yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir.   I've had the raw milk last two weeks in the fridge and still taste good. But I actually like it...
I saw in Nourishing Traditions that it can be used to make Pemmican later.
I looked through a few of their bars. I've certainly seen far worse snack foods for kids. What I notice is almost all of their products contain dates as the #1 or nearly #1 ingredient. So that is how they get away with not listing 'sugar' specifically, though the date sugar certainly makes up for it.   I would not think those at all suitable as a meal replacement. The protein seems to be from any nuts it contains so it is not likely a complete protein.
It's not just crock pots, it could be coffee mugs and anything with an enamel coating. Supposedly if it is a quality enamal applied properly the amount of lead it leaches is fairly small. But yes ideally it would be nice to avoid it entirely! There's an excellent article about how it is tested and such called Lead Glazes for Ceramic Foodware by Richard L. Lehman of Rutgers University from 2008.
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