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Posts by baltmom

Yes, sensory seeking and sensory avoiding behaviors often go together! My son has both, with his seeking usually being stronger. And yes, the whole thing is contradictory and inconsistent. Maybe in the case you mentioned, due to what was under his control vs. what was unpredictable. Can also change day to day and hour to hour. Just seems to be the nature of sensory stuff.   The flags that Linda mentioned jumped out at me too, especially because some were so similar...
I'm going to try the picture schedule. I haven't used this yet because he's so verbal that it never seemed it would be helpful, but I'm beginning to understand that his use of the words doesn't necessarily mean full comprehension of the concepts. Our days are very predictable (I work full time and he's in daycare full time, so our morning and evening routines don't have much room for change) but maybe he will feel better being able to predict the predictability, if that...
Thank you to all! So interesting and so helpful.   So this may muddy the waters a bit, but it isn't always such an explicit choice as the example I gave. In fact, that particular situation only turned into a choice because when I used to do what you suggest, crunchy mommy - just let him know I'm making dinner  and leave it at that - then he would get really upset if he kept doing what he was doing and then realized dinner was made and wish that he'd come over to...
This is such a specific thing that I doubt there will be many been there, done that stories exactly, but maybe someone will recognize a larger pattern and have some suggestions.   My son just turned 3 and has a HFA dx. Most of the time he’s a pretty joyful, easygoing guy. My parenting approach is based in connection and empathy. But there’s a certain meltdown that I’m really not sure how to handle, and I’m wondering if this is one of those instances of needing to...
I'm no expert, but I'll try to respond to some of your questions and I'm sure others with more experience and knowledge will chime in.   Yes, a sensory diet provides activities that provide that needed input.   For us, I really can't separate out sensory from mood - for my son, the sensory experience has such a large impact on the mood, and vice versa. If he's getting the input he needs, he's calm and regulated. If he's calm and regulated, he tolerates sensory...
UPDATE: We had the Chuck E Cheese party this morning and it went really well! I requested ahead of time not to have the show with the character since I knew that wouldn't go over well. Seven friends came, everyone played, we had pizza and cake (homemade), and then played some more. It was just his speed and he had a great time. It seemed everyone else did too. I also think one of the reasons he was able to stay regulated so well was that because I knew there wasn't much...
It sounds a bit to me like he could be sensory seeking. Maybe an under-aroused nervous system (hence the quietness as a younger child) that is now looking for the input it's missing. I wonder how he would respond to a sensory diet? Maybe an OT could help.
Expat, many of your descriptions of your son remind me so much of my own, who also loves books. Lately he's been very into the Babar books (I shorten and simplify the text a little), and also the Little Bear series (author Else Holmelund Minarik). Both are meant for much older kids but he always asks for them and then pays very close attention. In general I've found that many books with the I Can Read designation are the ones that capture his interest. 
This is a really good point. That's why last year we celebrated with just one adult friend, and I really thought we were headed the same direction this year, until he had such a good time at CC with daycare. I think (I hope) that for him it will feel like a similar outing - he and a few peers run around the toddler area, then have pizza and cake and go home. Sort of a birthday party without being so much of a birthday party, if you kwim.
Linda, Congratulations! I always appreciate everything you share on here and have already learned so very much from you. Thank you from the bottom of my heart. The kids, families, and other staff are lucky to have you. So glad to hear you have found and are following your passion! I too am considering some professional options I would never have even noticed were it not for my experiences parenting my son. That seems to be another gift that comes with special needs -...
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