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Posts by LitMom

I think it's completely weird, particularly since it's not like they ran out of food or drink, which does happen on accident at times. Not realize how much other kids might eat as compared to your own. Just switch to more snacks, and problem solved. I can see not having something like soda at a party drink-wise, just like at some adult parties there's no alcohol. But there should always be something! Lemonade, fruit juice, etc. The "no fridge water" is really really...
Also depends on what he means by teaching written language. You can certainly point out letters, and if the kid's not interested in the moment, just drop it. "Hey, that's a "B!" That letter is in your name too!," just like you might say "Hey, look! A train! Cool! You have toy trains at home too, but this is a big one!" Etc. I don't really see the big problem in this, although I think most kids are not going to get excited about it. Likewise with the foam mat kind of...
I don't think it has anything to do with vax status either. It's usually stuff like colds and flu that get passed around on trains and planes. I wipe down the seat arms and tray tables with sanitary wipes after we're seated. I often turn off the recycled air vents too, but I don't like the feel of them as well as the fact that they seem likely to be germ factories. Regular vitamins, sleep, and hand washing too. We've done that and gotten sick on 2 trips, but not on 10ish...
That sounds a little crazy. I wonder if it's something like a PP described where the teacher didn't pay enough attention before assigning it? We've been doing American history, but the only reason my Pre-K kid is doing it is because the Third grader is doing it so he's tagging along and I'm simplifying stuff for him. While she's actually learning about the stamp tax and tea etc, he's picked up that there was a king who wanted people to pay "too much" for tea so they...
  We have a chore time in the morning, basics like make your bed, put dirty clothes in the hamper, and sweep under the kitchen table. Generally anything on the pre-K kid's list is really "Help mom" do whatever chore. He helps me make his bed, he helps me sweep, he helps pick up his toys. We have two chore times for 15-20 minutes each time and I'd say he's really doing something about 5-10 minutes of each and the rest he's playing. 
Colonial Williamsburg was a fantastic place for both my kids, and while the pre-K kid has no real understanding of the passage of centuries, he does understand that it's set up as things were long ago. He particularly liked watching the weaver spin yarn from wool and cotton and the cabinet maker where he was fascinated by the harpsichord they were making.    We are now gearing up for the science fair, which he wants to do something for this year. He says he wants to...
  Well, perhaps the shortest answer to the OPs question, "how do you expect kids to do something or 'not give them a choice'?" may be that you don't practice particularly gentle discipline. I don't tend to post here, and frankly that's why. I don't use physical discipline, but I don't claim to be all gentle either.    Also, the "break her of something" refers to breaking a habit. Just like an adult habit like eating sweets after the kids are in bed or smoking or whatever....
  I'd say the reason it's going on for a year is because it's so exhausting and you or your husband give in that 10% of the time. So she knows if she pushes hard enough, she'll win. I've held doors shut, but I don't hold it the whole time for time outs. In the room, door closed. I used the bathroom as a secondary time out spot until this year because the kid bedroom had no door. Won't go? Leave time out? Bathroom. More boring and less comfy. Made their screaming echo...
  Then just take her in whatever state of undress she's in, with her clothes in a bag. It should be embarrassing for her. If you stick to it 100%, it will decrease. If you stick to it 90%, she will keep doing it, worse and worse, and longer and longer, because she's being given intermittent rewards to do so, which are generally the most reinforcing. I don't follow Dr. Phil, but this article talks about the intermittent reinforcement and power struggle...
  It's a power struggle. Don't even try being funny, bringing her clothes, encouraging her to choose her own. Refuse to do it. Be bored of it. It will be easier to break with your husband available though. Tell her you're leaving at x o'clock and having breakfast in x minutes. "Get dressed and come have breakfast with me. Then I'll take you to school." Give her the clothes you've chosen. Then go on with your own routine. Don't remind her. Don't nag her. Don't listen to...
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