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Posts by CallMeIshmael

Here's an interesting discussion among pediatricians about the financial logistics of vaccinating: http://idinchildren.com/200701/frame...roundtable.asp It's kind of fascinating to read all these people grumbling about upfront costs, reimbursements rates, and the need for backup generators.
But private sector docs buy the vaccine at the private sector cost, not the CDC cost. What you have to look at is what the insurance reimbursments are for vaxes. Most of the time insurance companies reimburse the wholesale cost of the vaccine. For unisuraed patients, many states uses VFC vaccines that are supplied free (and for which docs cannot charge). The way the docs do manage to make a profit on vaxes is to charge an "administration fee" -- i.e., the cost of...
Right, but remember that you're being charged for the product itself -- it's not as if the doc's office pockets the entire $305. Check out the cost of each vax here: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/vfc/cdc_vac_price_list.htm
Quote: Originally Posted by mamakay Are you still placing your money on "coincidence" being behind why people in families of Flumisted schoolkids were more likely to be hospitalized for influenza than the controls? Maybe, just for fun, it'd be worth looking at this in context. So this study looks at the effect of Flumisting schoolkids on symptom rates, healthcare clinic rates and hospitalization rates in "intervention" and "control"...
By far the biggest cause of blood in the stool in a breatfed baby this age is an anal fissure -- I'd be extra suspicous of that because he's crying with EC. Also anal fissures usually result in bright red, fresh-looking blood. You might want to take a careful look to see if you can find something -- they're usually midline, but can be a bit tricky to see. Sometimes they hide just inside, and you can't find them until the bum relaxes a bit (like just before a...
OK. Low hemoglobin and low hematocrit pretty much go together, so no surprises there. Small red blood cells are not immature, exactly, though I can see how your ped might call them that. Small red blood cells are a marker of a few things: iron def anemia (by far the most common reason) or a rare inherited hemoglobin problem like thalassemia or spherocytosis. I actually think that the small blood cells are very reassuring -- they totally go along with the notion...
Okey-doke. Good luck with the Fer-in-Sol. Nasty stuff, but it does the trick. Was there a concern about the immature red blood cells?
Sure, it's quite possible to be a snorer without having obstructive sleep apnea -- but a whole lot of snorers do have apnea. Do you ever hear him "get stuck"? He'll flat out stop breathing for a bit, you'll see his belly rise as if he's trying to, and then a few seconds later he's breathe in with a big snort? That would be pretty persuasive grounds for a sleep study. Regardless of his health, though, this sounds like reason enough for concern:...
I don't think there's any question whatsoever that SIDS peaks at ~2months of age. My concern is the erroneous information that there is a double peak at 2 and 4 months -- that seems to indict vaccines quite strongly. With a single peak at two months, it's easier to argue that other factors are at work. But haven't we had this discussion before? Another piece of misinformation used to link SIDS and vaccines is that Japan's infant death rates dropped when they delayed...
Quote: Originally Posted by MamaInTheBoonies With middle ear infections you cannot see them. That is why it's best to go by symptoms. This is a bit bewildering to me. As someone who as looked at hundreds and hundreds of eardurms through an otoscope, I can assure you that it's pretty easy to tell if there's a middle ear infection, unless there's a big chunk of wax in the way. But of course you always have to take the whole child into account,...
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