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Posts by rubelin

 He can't claim you are keeping your DD from him if he never asks to see her. He's a grown-up, he can call you if he wants to spend a holiday with his child. You told him clearly that he needed to be the one to make the plan. I would have been even more specific with the time frame (like you need at least a week's notice to make a plan).
Just from what I've seen of younger, first-time dads, if he's living with his parents when the baby is born, it's likely that his mom will do the "parenting" so the baby will be safe in that way.   Often, there's a very gradual visitation schedule for newborns and young babies - enough to allow the father to bond but not stress the baby with too much time away from the mother, but it varies on location (and how vindictive the father might be). Talk to a lawyer now to...
My ex lived in the house next door for more than 6 years, just moved almost 20 miles away last month (45 min with no traffic, usually WAY longer than that).   It was very good for the kids when he was right there and I didn't have to be so far away from them. He started dating his now-fiancee about 2.5 yrs ago and then he'd spend any time he didn't have the kids up at her house (in the city he just moved to) He's got the kids about 30% now, down from 40% that he used to...
I'd keep fighting for the kid's father to step-up and be in their lives but this baby is THEIR brother, and not connected to you in any way. It's great for them if their parents can have a peaceful relationship in general, not only so you can get in on some extra baby cuddles, though I totally get that desire ;-)
Hey, just wanted to welcome you to the Single Parents board. I hope your test results are favorable. If you really are a dad, I hope you'll hang around with us as you start that journey =)     I agree with the PP that she's probably hoping the baby isn't yours; that would be easiest for her and her BF. I know it all feels like it's taking a very long time and that she's being very stingy with visiting but try to see her side of it - that she doesn't want to go out of...
If you have an agreement, the courts will usually just sign off on it. They aren't interested in stirring up what already works for both parties.
I haven't had to deal with that, but it seems that the ones who have offered a step-up sort of visit schedule, like a couple hours at a public place once a week to get the kids re-acquainted with their dad. If he's serious about getting to know his kids and isn't just trying to prove something or get his CS lowered, then he shouldn't have a good reason to say no to your offer and he should happily get involved in playing with them at the park and not just sit on a...
the main thing that worked for us was having a very regular schedule. The kids (who were 7 & 3 at the time) knew exactly when they'd see Daddy so there was no anxiety or wondering to throw them off. Is your ex willing to do something like that? Even just a few hours for dinner on the same night of the week?? All kids thrive with some routine to their lives and I'd think that especially for a kid on the spectrum, it would be a huge help.
I haven't read the newer books but the main ones I recommend are The Diaper Free Baby by Christine Gross-Loh http://www.thediaperfreebaby.com/ Diaper Free! The Gentle Wisdom of Natural Infant Hygiene by Ingrid Bauer http://www.natural-wisdom.com/ Infant Potty Training by Laurie Boucke http://www.timl.com/ipt/ EC Simplified by Andrea Olson, MA http://ecsimplified.com/book/ hope that helps =)
oh, that happens to me all the time, especially at school. I just correct the person in a gentle, casual way (oh, you mean my XH?), though they usually get super apologetic. It doesn't bother me, it's common for people to think that parents are married. I think it's an expression of how well my kids are adjusted to having divorced parents. In fact, my youngest's teacher just yesterday asked if the kids needed support with the divorce and was shocked to know it happened...
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