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Posts by kentuckymom

As many people have mentioned, I recommend looking for Parks and Rec and/or YMCA classes in your area. They are normally the lowest cost activities available. Don't assume you can't afford a class until you ask if there is financial support available. The YMCA in particular usually offers a lot of financial assistance if you qualify.   If you find some classes/sports you can afford, let your 5 year old pick just one and feel free to tell your 3 year old that he's not old...
I wish I had a solution for you. My son, who is almost 9, still wear pull ups at night, and they're still soaking wet every single morning. I can remember two times in his life when he woke up dry. Both my husband and my brother wet the bed regularly well into elementary school, so I think there's something to the whole "runs in families" thing. Also, FWIW, I usually wake up several times a night to use the bathroom. I think DS is like me, but, since he's a really sound...
My DS transitioned from a crib to  twin bed when he was 2 years 2 months. He was trying to climb out of his crib, and we didn't want him to fall out and get hurt. He adjusted with no problems. The only change was positive - when he was in the crib he'd scream when he woke up in the morning for us to come and get him. When he moved to the big bed, he would just come find us, or sometimes just go find a toy and play quietly. It never occurred to him to turn on lights or make...
Almost all of the parents I know, and many of the teachers, DO question the fact that kindergarten has become "the new first grade." All the questioning in the world, however, won't get us anywhere if the people who make education policy don't change their minds. For the time being, parents and teachers have to work with what they have. This means, among other things, that kids with birthdays near the cutoff will often be kept in preschool for one more year.
The thread about charters got me to thinking about magnet schools, which are similar in some ways. Kentucky doesn't have charter schools, but my district has a ton of magnet schools, including the elementary school DS attends. I have mixed feelings about them.   On the positive side, they can provide a diverse array of choices for parents and students, all fully within the public school system. Elementary choices in our district include a Spanish immersion school and...
Kentucky doesn't have charter schools, so keep in mind that I have zero personal experience with them. Based one what I've read about the success and lack thereof of charter schools, it seems there are a few possible outcomes for them:   1) Within a successful school distract, charter schools can provide a good place for kids that don't "fit" in the regular system. This can be accomplished with a project based learning model, an arts focus, etc. This kind of thing can...
I think, when you have kids who struggle academically, it can seem like everyone else in the world is raising little geniuses. My DS is dyslexic, and I used to want to scream at all my Facebook friends who were posting about their kids sounding out words in preschool, or getting bored in first grade because they were expected to ready Junie B Jones when they really wanted to read Harry Potter.   As time has gone on, though, I've found out that there are more struggling...
You've gotten a lot of good advice. Here are a few more thoughts that might help.... when DS was in kindergarten he was helped greatly by having a small stuffed animal from home to hold. When he was doing seatwork it sat at his desk and "watched" him, and had to stay at his table during lunch, specials, and recess. Having that little thing from home really did seem to help his comfort level, however. There was one boy who cried for most of the day for the first couple...
When DS was in public preschool and the first half of K, before DD was born, I spent a lot of time at his school. Most of my volunteer hours were spent in the library, shelving books and doing other tasks for the librarian to free her up to do the many other parts of her job. She was thrilled that I was willing to shelve the nonfiction books. Apparently the one other parent who helped shelve books thought that finding the position of the books using numbers instead of...
I noticed that this thread had recently been updated, so I skimmed the reference articles. Unless I missed something major in my skimming, it seems those studies are of full time daycare, not of the kind of part time preschool this thread referenced. Don't let studies like that scare you away from part time preschool if you think it would be a good thing for your family.
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