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Posts by spruce

Hi! Totally doable. I homeschooled my daughters (many moons ago) in an 18x20 cabin with no running water. :-) 1) Make sure you give away or sell anything you don't use regularly or really need. Put stuff in a cardboard box, and if, in a month or 6 weeks you haven't opened the box...don't even look at it. Give it away. 2) Use your walls!!! Shelving, posters, anything that can go up, not out. Lots of drawers for crayons and clay and so forth instead of boxes. 3)...
We don't have any issues so far with the glassware or the burner.  :)  I love your homemade ideas, too!
   Hi, Fillyjonk, I spent some extra time today with my 12 yo, asking him questions about the experiments he has done so far, and how the book is working out, and was VERY happy with his answers.  I went over the book  a bit when we first opened the set, then let him have at it, but it looks to be very well written, with explanations on how scientific words are put together, what reactions are happening and why, definitions of all terms...it's pretty neatly tied up. Every...
We are using Thames and Kosmos Chem C3000.  It is our "fun" science, and my 12 yo especially loves it.   As for books or texts...things like Steve Spangler's "Naked Eggs and Flying Potatoes" are what get us through.  Yes, textbooks are useful, but real books, really meant to be read and ACTED UPON by kids, work much better for overall education.    I am a chem/bio/trig junkie, and it's hard for me to find a way to teach my kids that isn't by rote learning...I want them...
Oh, fillyjonk, I thought you were looking for an organizational tool for reading by age or by subject?  Looks like bookhing is more like Little Free Libraries, which really interests me also.   p
i don't have any recommendations, but I am also interested in replies here.    My 12 yo and 9yo sons read like I do...whatever is in front of them....:)  so I hope to help them organize their reading time just a tiny bit more.  I am not hoping for whole lists of "read this at age that" or "every book for kids who love xyz...."  just for a pointer.   /my favorite way to find new books is STILL to walk down the rows at the library and find books with interesting spines!...
:hug    Today is our 3rd daughter's 18th birthday.  EIGHTEEN.  Believe, me, I know the "I blinked" feeling!   Hug him a little harder...my 12 yo son just started being physically standoffish if we're in public.  That make me teary every time, even though I know it's normal.    love, p
Thanks for the Bravewriter tip!  I love the idea of poetry teas...and I think my kidlets will love it as well.  :)   My 9yo is  a dedicated fable writer...he loves to write that one type of story, and this site has given me good ways to jump further with him and encourage other types of writing.  (Currently, he is loathing the "conversation" writing....he hates quotation marks!)   thanks again, p  
Hi, Rainbow.    I want to preface this by saying I am not a whole-life Waldorf homeschooler.  We tried full-on Waldorf last year and it was a bit much for me...but we use a lot of the styles of learning and the artwork...and I enjoy integrating many Waldorf math lessons into our days.   We have 7 children, 3 are graduated, and 4 are still homeschooling.  My active schoolers are 12, 9, and 7.  We are using Moving Beyond the Page, but we do Main Lesson books for...
  Hi, Amy,   You don't pay separately for each child, but each will have their own "login" button.  It's pretty cheap for what you get, and up to 4 kids are always one price.   I just signed my 12, 9, and 7 year olds up for the 6 month subscription tonight, and it's $99 for 6 months.  If you want to go monthly, it's $19 IIRC, but they're offering one month free right now.   (I had forgotten about Dreambox!  Thanks for the thread, OP!)   p
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