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Posts by LizD

In my experience some of the Steiner people will ostracize you, some won't, and your children will probably be fine. I still lament the gap between the really good things about the Waldorf approach and the positives of other methods, but you can always create room in your life for the things you feel are missing. And attend the holiday fairs, hold your own advent garden, etc. Hope the transition is smooth and that your friends are truly friends.
There's the usual positional things to help the baby move (hands-and-knees, lying on sides on the couch when reading or watching TV), and you'll be working with your chiropractor, and it's early; you have time for baby to move. But I wanted to point out that sometimes OP can be normal. Babies often seek the position they need to be born in, for reasons we don't always understand (like babies who flip to breech in labor). All my babies were born direct OP, even the...
Hospital staff will not be held liable for anything they do that they feel is saving a life, whether you consent or not. This may be morally wrong and legally questionable but it's what those of us "in the biz" have seen time and again, even court-ordered cesareans.    *I* do not hoot and laugh at birth plans, but I know just about everyone else does, and I find it abhorrent. My point was that even the "this is different!" hospitals are often the same old story, deep...
Wow. I am quite surprised. That is, as you no doubt know, quite outdated even by mainstream standards. We use cytotec per rectum for PP haemorrhage, and the old standard of cervidil the night before a pit induction. The Cervidil you can at least get out again if indicated. :\
I am sorry to sound so dour. But I do not work in a big busy high-risk center, I work in a birth center much like you describe. We have the lowest C-section rate in the area, LDRP rooms and our own OR/PACU, we offer waterbirth, we strongly encourage rooming-in and breastfeeding, we have more midwives (who also deliver at home) than OBs, etc. Some of the nurses are or were doulas as well. However, even when nurses believe in the things you want, they still laugh at birth...
I was a doula and it never entered my head to have one at my own birthing. :) My midwife brought two other licensed midwives to assist her, and my neighbor, a lay midwife, came to keep my older child company. I'm also a curl-into-fetal-position-and-wait person when having a baby, so there wouldn't have been anything for a doula to do. :) 
I have to second the comment/s that it's far too long. I am an OB nurse and our childbirth center really does try to do a lot of these things as the standard of care...but the nurses still laugh at and hoot over birth plans at the nurses' station (as well as joke to get the OR ready- and our hospital is committed to maintaining a low c-section rate). If you want this much control over your care you need to plan an out-of-hospital birth. I'm sorry to be so discouraging...
I'm a nurse in a small community hospital's Childbirth Center. I love that the midwives first assist. It preserves continuity of care and seems to uphold respect for the midwife as a medical professional. I see a far more collegial atmosphere betweeen OBs, midwives, nurses, techs in our practice than anywhere I worked as a doula, and I suspect this is a factor. 
Quote: Originally Posted by ANewDoula So for those of you who have a ADN, did you attend a local community college? Thanks Jes Yes, and it was an excellent experience. Shop carefully, though, because another community college in my area is very hard on students and has a high failure rate. My school was extremely supportive in general and the nursing program in particular was able to maintain high standards while being flexible with its...
Thanks for taking the time to write while supporting your FIL and family. I hope his health improves soon.
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