or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by NYCVeg

Oh, brother. I don't just wipe the kid. I ask the parent if it's okay.    Dd is actually one of two children in her dance class who is contact allergic/anaphylactic to wheat. The other parents have been really wonderful and understanding. I've been really lucky, both in school and extracurriculars, to deal with other parents who appreciate what it's like to have a child with life-threatening allergies and who are extremely considerate about trying to keep my child...
I kind of can't believe I'm having this conversation. I have said multiple times that I have NO expectations of others. I take care of my kid and do my best to keep her safe. THE OP ASKED WHAT SHE COULD DO TO KEEP FOOD ALLERGIC KIDS SAFE. I responded that cleaning your kids and keeping food in designated areas is more important than not bringing the allergens altogether. I stick by that.    I'm out of this thread.
No, it's not meaningless. The more parents keep food away from play equipment--ALL food, not just nuts--the safer it is for food-allergic children. Children leave far more food residue on playground equipment than squirrels. Perfectly clean spaces are an impossibility; no one understands that more than I. (Did you even read my post? I said that playgrounds are only a tiny fraction of what I deal with on a daily basis AND I said that totally clean public spaces are an...
Chiming in as the parent of a severely food-allergic child.    My child is allergic to peanuts and tree nuts as well as eggs and fish and sesame and a whole host of other foods, but she is most severely allergic to wheat. She is anaphylactic, contact allergic, airway allergic.    Life for us means being hyper-vigilant ALL THE TIME. If dd's friend has a bag of goldfish, they can't sit next to each other on the bus. At the playground, she knows to stay away from...
ktarr, you already got responses in the other thread. The consensus is that you need to take your child to a doctor. There is no other advice that anyone can give at this point.
We live in a co-op apartment building with a lot of rules about noise, etc. We try very, very hard to teach dd to be courteous to and respectful of her neighbors. This is her community, too, after all. Just as I expect my next door neighbor not to blast his TV at night so my kid can sleep, I expect my dd not to rattle the light fixtures of the apartment below her. As someone who's incredibly sensitive to noise and who works at home, I know very well how difficult it can...
It's kind of baffling to me that people on this thread keep repeating the claim dresses are so restrictive. My dd wears soft, cotton knit dresses with leggings or bike shorts underneath, because that is how SHE feels more comfortable playing. She is not "encumbered" by her clothing (she finds jeans and corduroys and the like much more restrictive of climbing, biking, tumbling, and the like and refuses to wear them). She is not "focused on her looks" simply because she's...
We don't, for a few reasons: 1) We live in an apartment and have downstairs neighbors 2) We have very slick, hardwood floors and dd has slipped a few times 3) The apartment is small, so there's a real risk of crashing into things   A significant amount of ballet dancing still happens though. :) 
Actually, I believe that statistically the world is far SAFER than it was in "the good old days." We only perceive that things are somehow much more dangerous and scary.  
I went to sleep-away camp for two weeks when I was 9 (my choice--honestly, I think it was a lot harder on my parents than it was on me). The next summer, when I was 10, I started going for 6 weeks (also my choice). There was a parents' visiting day in the middle of the longer session. 9 or 10 seems to be a common age to start doing sleep-away camp among kids I know.    Dd started doing sleepovers at her grandparents' at around 3 or a little before. She loves them!...
New Posts  All Forums: