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Posts by JohannasGarden

Miralax is commonly prescribed at high doses for long periods of time in young children. With a child who has been very constipated for a long time, they may need a lot to keep them cleaned out. If a stretched out colon is a likely factor in their troubles, then it can be important to keep them cleaned out. My son at 4 was on two capfuls a day. Also, I think the miralax group can be a great resource, even if you choose to keep using miralax. Just don't post about it if...
I've usually told a whole lot of people, though not everyone in DS's life. It's sort of part of my personality to just talk about everything that I think of talking about. DS always used to love to be talked about in any way, shape or form and didn't have privacy issues that I could see. Now he frequently doesn't want people talking about him or knowing things about him. Even things we're all proud of like when he passed his first belt exam for his Kung Fu class, he'll say...
With the lack of weight gain, I think it would be a good idea to do a scope with biopsies. If that doesn't turn up celiac evidence or eosinophils, I would definitely go for metabolic testing of some sort. developmental delays with poor weight gain is just something to check out thoroughly. I would try to get in before doing much in the way of eliminations. Before rushing into GFCF, you might want to read up on the specific carbohydrate diet--we didn't experience...
Quote: Originally Posted by bdavis337 I'm not opposed, I just haven't been convinced that it's absolutely necessary. The dev pedi only gave me only vague comments about 1% of all autistic children having a genetic link Basic caryotyping, I believe, could be done without seeing a geneticist, at least not the hours long workup. I don't think he really explained what that 1% number means. I mean, there's a genetic connection, IMO, in well beyond...
Yeah, I would at least consult with a neurologist. Your little one is so young--I might also talk with the midwife who was concerned, ask if she's ever seen something like it before. She's probably observed a lot of babies, kwim. I have had doctors pooh-pooh a specialist referral when I sort of bring it up, but not when I say "I really want him to be seen by a _______." Sherri
I just read the link for Celeste in your sig. I'm not familiar with Make a Child Smile and was intrigued by the part about her liking reading her smile mail. How does this work. Oh, and after reading that--no doubt you have the right gifts in mind for her. Amira will love bringing them to her. And maybe if someone she likes from American Idol lives near you they would pay her a visit. Sherri
Both Waldorf dolls and Build-a-Bear animals, usually anything that can have a nice wardrobe are popular with 8 y.o. girls that I know. I agree with other posters who say it's more important for kids to have the things they love than it is to seem as much as possible like their peers. I wouldn't have wanted to be denied toys because they weren't appropriate to my age or gender. While I was not a child with special needs, I was sort of a weird kid and got teased...
Good decision. Also, unless you know otherwise, I would not assume that the special needs are a drawback in a school like this. They may actually be looking for special needs kids whose parents they can work well with to create consistency between home and school. With seizures, I would also make it clear that you will provide them with resources and information in the hopefully unlikely event that he'll have one at school as well as your availability to come deal with the...
I'm really glad the eyeblinking has dramatically improved. I tend to think that you should either follow-up with the opthamologist or find another one who more greatly inspires your trust. I see two main possibilities: something with his eyes, which can really be a bunch of things even though allergies are the most likely, or the tic suddenly subsided at the same time. How long has it been going on? 4 to 8 weeks is a common duration, but they can be shorter. Usually...
I know this isn't what you asked for, but if saying "no" is a consistent tantrum trigger, you may want to consider whether you can make things more predictable? My DS, 7, has begun telling me that he feels a lot of stress around not knowing when I'll say yes and when I'll say no to treat-like foods, sweet sauces, etc. If he builds up a particular expectation in his mind, imaginging himself having X for a snack, then it really throws him if I say, "No, you just had 2 since...
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