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Posts by JohannasGarden

Lots of good posts: I thought Finch's was especially helpful, and Momily's added in a good caution. I'd center on the ways you like the way you are. Let her know that you are open to giving your perspective at a later date--sometimes questions pile up over time or a parent may be open to reading things later that wouldn't be so helpful now. Sherri
Please ignore what I say if it doesn't apply to your situation or make sense where you are right now, but some of the marriage issues I can relate to. I was totally tapped out emotionally by the kids, but at the same time got meaningful relating/loving/identity-formation from my time with them. A lot of my intellectual needs have been met by devouring information about my DS's issues and trying to see how he sees the world. It's very different for my DH. His time with...
Sounds like fun, and I definitely thing that if ShaggyDaddy's family wants to see you guys in the kids, you should tell them "sure, but only if you come meet us at this playground. Here's the address, just let us know when we should meet you there." Sherri
I homeschool my 7 y.o. Aspie DS. The main challenge there is social--so many homeschool gatherings are too intense for DS. He likes them, but his behavior deteriorates and he pushes other kids boundaries and they stop liking him so much. Younger DD and I are very social, so it can be tough for us. I am glad I am homeschooling--I am uncertain what will be best for younger DD. She has a 2 day a week preschool right now. I think she would love school, but I really don't...
[QUOTE=ShaggyDaddy;10272660]it should be noted that apsergers is not "no speech delay" but no "no clinically significant general delay in language (e.g., single words used by age 2 years, communicative phrases used by age 3 years)." Which is kind of a funny definition, because a child who barely met that criteria would be considered to have a clinically significant delay (not using 2 word phrases by 2 is considered significant). The distinction between ASD and...
Oh, and it's also common for the "should be evaluated for" section of the report to contain a number of things the scan doesn't really indicate. When I was being evaluated for MS, the scan mentioned the possibility of MS because of the white spot, but in fact the MRI ruled out MS as much as you can r/o MS. Sherri
I think it means that when they look at the MRI that it is basically a white spot. Lots of things show up as white spots, little spaces in the brain (I have a single white spot, btw, and that's what people guess mine is), demyelination (someone w/ MS might have a whole lot of these, I can't remember how Lyme shows when it shows, but it may be similar), I think that children with autism sometimes have unidentified bright objects, as do kids with a number of other things,...
Is melatonin only available in pills? Any tips on getting a kid who doesn't swallow pills to take it? Does it taste bad/change potency if your crush and mix it? How long before bed do you give it? Sherri
I would not assume OCD at this point. I also am not certain that you would find something really helpful quickly if you did. Your child has a "having to do a thing with a thing" issue, and that can be associated with some things like sensory issues, autism spectrum conditions, anxiety/obsessive compulsive rituals--and some young kids are just much more intense about such things. Some things you could research would be these: 1) Find out about EI services in your...
Well, the FISH test isn't the only test there is. It may be that as a child develops, things develop that suggest particular disorders. I mean, if you see a geneticist at all, you probably either leave with a diagnosis, a "if X develops in the next few years, we can dx Y disorder" sort of thing, or something significantly atypical that isn't explained as yet. For example, my DS is seeing a geneticist next month because he seems to meet the cafe au lait criteria for NF1...
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