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Posts by Lillian J

You'll find that things can be a whole lot more natural and easy in a home setting. You'll find over time that it doesn't necessarily need to come in lessons you teach, but in learning that happens in the most surprising, fun, and natural, ways. Lessons can work fine, of course, but they don't need to come in the more traditional format we were brought up with in schools. For example, check out FUN-Books for lots of great ideas and unusual resources you may not find...
Absolutely! I was assuming the OP was referring to her family wanting her baby to go now, which may not be the case - but even if the pressure is about sending him later, there's no reason to have to think about it or discuss it with them at this point. And by the time preschool becomes a viable consideration years from now, there may be smaller and more nurturing environments to look at - there are even some co-op ones where you can participate. The more I think about...
When my son was little, he had absolutely no interest in arts or crafts - and he didn't even have an interest in cars or other wheeled things - but I can't see how that ever handicapped him in any way. I used to read to him, and he loved some books, but didn't get interested in really sitting and absorbing them till much later - and he eventually became a voracious reader in his teens. He loved to learn about all sorts of other things over the years, and became quite...
KINDERCARE?!!   Has it come to that? I hadn't even heard of this trend/fad. I don't think you should even bother to debate it with them - this is absolutely ridiculous, and he deserves a lot better. You don't need to start any particular sort of "educational" games and projects with him either - what he needs at this point is to have happy, normal, fun, nurturing, childhood life and activities with his mom. Here's a page of links to articles that support/explain the real...
 
I applaud you for going out of your way to make the system work well for everyone.   On a side note - and at the risk of having rotten cyber-tomatoes thrown at me , I'd just like to toss in that I think it would be nice to somehow, politely and indirectly, of course, encourage individuals not to check out huge numbers of books and keep them all up to their full time limit when they're not even using them all - there are only so many books that can be read at a time....
I agree that leaving reading for later ages works better - although I'd say even much later unless the child expresses interest earlier. Here's a thread that's full of ideas, and links to lots of other ideas, on how reading can be introduced and learned: "So I am not a homeschooler but my DD wants to read."   Lillian
There's been quite quite a bit of discussion of the program here. This is a list of threads on it.   You'll also find a lot about young children and reading in my noncommercial page of links to articles and websites by experienced homeschooling parents and educational specialists - preschool and kindergarten learning activities.   Lillian        
You started homeschooling just two months ago, so I'd say he's going through a perfectly normal transition period. It seems like a strange phenomenon sometimes, but it's pretty typical. Here's a thread about decompression and deschooling that it would be helpful and reassuring to read. And here's one started by the mom of a 7 yr. old who had just begun homeschooling: Trying to trust the process. You may feel that he had the whole summer to relax and play, so that should...
By far the most valuable thing I remember about my son's kindergarten - he was in a Waldorf school then - was the time spent outdoors in imaginative play with other children. That's the thing the school year would have not have been complete without. There were fairy tales, crafts, songs, ceremonies and festivals, making soup and bread, indoor imaginative play with lots of little figures and scarves, etc. - but the most imagination building element was the outdoor...
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