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Posts by LynnS6

I'd look at this another way:   Not "should I have to wake him up" but "he's lacking some skills that help him get out the door and to school on time". He's also lacking self regulation skills. What can you do to help him learn the skills?  1) Make him turn off the screen earlier. It's not micromanaging if he doesn't yet have the skills. If he has the skills and  you're still managing it for him, that's micromanaging. For him, I'd say if he has to get up at 7,...
Yes, I'd wake him. 16 year olds still need a lot of scaffolding to keep their lives in order. Some more than others.   However, I wouldn't be driving him. 2 1/2 miles isn't that far. The natural consequence of not getting your butt out of bed in time is that you have to walk/bike on your own to school. My 11 year old walks or bikes a mile to school and back every day, and I can't see adding another 1 1/2 miles being a real hardship for him. Yes, it'll probably take...
The school, if it's a public school, is required by federal law to provide appropriate educational services for the children with special needs, regardless of the size of the school. Unfortunately, parents very often have to fight very very hard to get them.   This school was the right choice for your children 9 years ago. Is it still the right choice for your children now? If you think it is, is there a way to increase the parent volunteer hours so there can be a...
This is what I would do: Talk to the teacher about the vocabulary sheets. Ask him/her why they're not being done in class and what she can do to help him get them done at school because they're a struggle at home. Go to goodwill and buy a dictionary for 99 cents, or ask the school if they have one you can borrow. The nice things about dictionaries is that they aren't really out of date for most basic words, so who cares if it's 1972 dictionary?   Talk to the...
  If it's someone I knew, yes, I would. Just because they're having fun doesn't mean it's OK. A quick "hey, it's not OK to use those words" goes a long way. Hell, I can usually get them with raised eyebrows and "The Look". It's not like a make a huge production. I just let them know that what they're doing isn't OK. Just like I let them know that riding bikes over someone's newly seeded lawn, or tossing someone's water bottle in the trash because you're frustrated with...
  Seriously? My 8 year old knows better than to say these things, and I don't think for a minute that she's a particularly enlightened child. You do not call people names. Period. And I will come down hard on anyone who does it, just like I did for the neighbor's 13 year old who was calling my daughter "fat" and a "brat".   If you don't tell them what's wrong, how are they going to learn? That's an attitude I really don't understand. Bigoted teenspeak is still bigotry. No...
Are you always rescuing her from her overconfidence? There's nothing like getting the feedback from the real world to let you know that you were wrong. If you do, stop. If you don't rescue her, then I might talk to the school counselor about how she doesn't seem to have a reasonable perception of what's going on.   Somewhere there is research to show that incompetent people often overestimate their skills. One of the reasons they're not competent is that they don't...
I think it's a bit extreme to say "take him off the bus" after an incident of teasing.   In addition to talking to the bus driver, TALK TO THE SCHOOL. They also need to know about this and if they've got kids who are bullying, those kids can be kicked off the bus. That, to me, is a more reasonable solution than you pulling your child (who has done nothing wrong) off the bus. It sounds right now it's not extreme. Obviously if it gets extreme, you'd need to find him...
Kids' bodies mature at different times. I would try a couple of nights without the pull-up to see if she's ready. If she's not, just go back to it and tray again in 6 months. I'd tell her that some kids' bodies are ready to go all night without peeing when they're 2 or 3, and other kids aren't ready until they're closer to 10. Doctors won't do anything for a 6 year old bed wetter, because it's still within the range of normal. It's not until they get close to puberty...
How much more of the class is there? How much money would that cost? Is there a way she can earn that money to "pay back" the cost of the course?   Why does her therapist think it's good for her to finish out? If this is a manifestation of something like social anxiety and she's working on getting used to being slightly uncomfortable in a group setting, I could see where it might have value. If it's simply a case of not letting her "win" a power struggle, I would see...
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