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Posts by cottonwood

"no more bleeding? Just actually feeling like having sex?" Yes, and yes. Actually, the first one is not set in stone -- the idea is that if you're done bleeding you're likely internally healed so that there is less risk of infection in introducing an object (and that goes for any object) into your vagina. But in reality presence or absence of discharge and desire for sex don't always match up, and the risk does seem to be pretty low. My midwife says that in her practice...
My boys are 10 and 12 and haven't ever done much in the way of handwriting. Most of their writing is done using a keyboard, and I've stressed the value of learning to type, so they're pretty proficient at that. Recently it was my 12-year-old's turn to be Dungeon Master in his D&D group so he had to write out the scenario he'd be taking people through. But our printer isn't working so he wrote the whole thing out by hand. No complaint, no concern, he just did it because...
I'm not interested in clubs or sports or any sort of organized group. Do you think there's something wrong with me? So why is it exactly that you believe these things are so important? Quote: Originally Posted by pigpokey Perhaps you could do the equivalent of activity scattering to satisfy yourself that you're giving her opportunity. But rather it would be *your* activity and she could choose whether to participate or to read a book. E.g., I am...
I second the Children Of The Code site -- it's fascinating what a wide variety of research and theories there are about reading. Quote: Originally Posted by moominmamma There's no standard neurological circuit that we simply tap into. Learning to read is a unique process that each brain has to master for itself by recruiting suitable circuits and linking them up. Do you have a source for this?
I love that video -- he's so funny! Here's another one, more recent: http://fora.tv/2009/01/29/Sir_Ken_Ro...Human_Capacity
Quote: I do wonder how children in USing families interpret this lack of expectations -when the cultural norm is often high expectations (you will do your homework, you will go to class, you will get an afterschhol job, you will play a sport, etc) A deep fear I have is that it will be seen as lack of caring by my children- although I know this is not true - I know my kids know I care about them. I just express it so differently than those around me who...
Quote: Originally Posted by greenthumb3 I have been reading to my eldest since he was a baby, and we have done a smattering of phonics once in a while, but when asked at random "what does this say", pointing to a page in a book, he'll pipe up what he *remembers* the page saying from last time we read (many times they are rhyming passages) or he will *guess* from what the picture is. I have found myself getting flustered, and remembering how *I* learned to...
I have expectations in the sense that I believe or assume that certain things will naturally happen because it's in their nature. I don't have expectations in terms of having a personal desire or interest in my children doing certain things with their lives. If one of my children came to me and said that she wished I had higher academic expectations of her, I'd want her to clarify what she really meant by that. My assumption would be that she herself has academic...
I have an eight-year-old girl who would LOVE to be involved in this. ETA: she says to say that she likes roller skating, swimming, collecting rocks, chickens, climbing trees, and jumping on trampolines.
I love that page. My five-year-old understands getting sick, so she understands what it means when I say that her teeth could get sick if she doesn't keep them clean. Who wants to get sick? I'm guessing that he *does* get it, but that some amorphous future possibility is (reasonably) less compelling to him than his present experience. At that age they live so much in the moment. The most pertinent issue to him is, is it good or bad now? I'm assuming that he finds...
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