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Posts by mavery

I use jojoba oil in the morning, but I use tamanu oil at night (to clear up scars) or neem oil (on individual spots). I only use those at night bc the tamanu oil is very yellow(!) and both smell a little odd.
Quote: Originally Posted by MamaWindmill Wouldn't you agree, though, that Parisian women are part of a much larger cultural group, while the FLDS women are part of a much, much smaller group which has purposely isolated itself from the larger culture? Thus, this speaking pattern - which is not typical for the larger cultural group in which the FLDS people are located - is partly the result of the value this group places on meek, coquettish, child-like...
I'm a linguist, and what I hear is a distinct accent (I'm not American and not good enough at regional accents to make good comparisons but it doesn't sound so far off some of the accents I've heard from that area), plus a generally higher pitch of speech (which is what makes it sound child-like, and I think is what those of you who think their speech sounds "soft" are hearing -- there's nothing soft about their consonants that I can hear), plus pretty wide intonation...
ITA that it depends on your child AND your personality. I found being the mother of an infant time-consuming but not draining. Ds was relatively high-maintenance but I could do a lot of things on auto-pilot and be off in my own head (while I was walking for hours with him strapped on my back trying to get him to take a long nap, nursing every 30 minutes, etc.) Once he started walking and talking (especially talking!) I found things got much harder for me. But I think...
Quote: Originally Posted by ananas I think it depends a lot on context and tone. ITA with this. I DO use descriptors like "black", "white", "Asian", but I use them in contexts in which that's the most prominently available descriptor and I try not to use them to categorize people and I pay very careful attention to whether I'm stereotyping or associating anything disrespectful with color or ethnicity descriptions. I also am trying to teach my ds...
As the parent of an ultra-social child, can I just say that if you can set clear boundaries, I expect the parents of the kids will help you enforce them. My ds always wants to go over to our neighbours' and they are so friendly, they almost never say no. Sometimes I think they would probably rather not have my ds over. Now that it's spring and everyone's outside in the yard, I am planning to go over and say "I really appreciate that you let ds visit with you sometimes. I...
Quote: Originally Posted by LynnS6 Yes, but the grammar police are just the enforcers. Who writes the laws?! (I'm a linguist, I get to!) Me too! Actually I was thinking we're the Secret Grammar Police, since officially Prescriptivism is Bad but when I see those apostrophe's (ha ha), or "infer" for "imply", I'm Making a Note in My Book.....
I think it's hard to know based on the current science. I decided to avoid them in large doses (e.g. in a lotion used everyday), but not go nuts over it. However, the Burt's Bees diaper cream we used (ds is no longer in diapers!) contained lavender. I actually feel a little bit more comfortable about lavender than about TTO because my sense is it has a better known history of use for kids. (It's possible TTO does too, but bc it's not traditional to cultures I know...
Quote: Originally Posted by jenmk It's not grammatically correct to say "I feel gratitude to you" but it is correct to say "I feel gratitude for what you did". I beg to differ... There are two ways of thinking about that prepositional phrase; either it's a complement of "feel" or it's a complement of "gratitude". If it's a complement of "feel" then "towards" is actually okay (as in the OP). If it's a complement of "gratitude" then it can...
The best choice would be "gratitude TO you". (Think of "grateful to", not "grateful towards" or "grateful for you".)
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