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Posts by chalupamom

- Scrabble, Jr. - Zingo - CandyLand - Pirate's Cove - Chutes and Ladders - dominoes (o.k., not a board game!) - memory (o.k., another one that's not a board game...) - Uno (yet another one that has no board)
They may well need a period of chilling out. If you're interested and personally need more structure right now, creating mini-"unit studies" around Reading Rainbow or MythBusters or whatever might well keep them interested long enough to feel more secure about their new life. You may also get some enthusiasm in having lots of outings and new stimuli - museums if you haven't traditionally gone, plays, movies, etc.
My everyday life blog is Hot Water Bath and my homeschooling-related blog is The New Classical Family. Since I separated the two topics (and may yet do another division to create a crafting and sewing blog) I've totally recharged my writing energies. It's made a huge difference.
You might check out Laura Berquist's Designing Your Own Classical Curriculum, even if you don't lean toward a classical methodology. The book is a great resource for gaining courage to sort of go the pick-and-choose route, which might be just the ticket for you in terms of maintaining the freedom and flexibility you like but also gaining a smidge more structure. Berquist writes from a Roman Catholic perspective, which I did not find to interfere with the book's overall...
MythBusters is verrrrrry popuar at our house, as is This Old House, Modern Marvels (we're selective about the topics with this one), a lot of the IMAX films (some of these are rather short, so they might not fulfill your "getting some sleep" goals, though!), Reading Rainbow, Cyberchase and Magic Schoolbus.
Lego Mindstorms looks interesting - it's something I'm keeping an eye on for my son. They look to be a little much for now, but definitely worth checking out. (Also, search on YouTube for Mindstorm videos - my six year old was RAPT. Seriously.) Snap Circuits seem o.k., to me, if a little "canned". Could you maybe find a more advanced version of the electrical set you have to allow a little more freedom and possibility for failure? You might also check out American...
I'm in Southeast Pennsylvania. Personally, I don't find the requirements here that terrible - a pain in the behind, yes, and I'd certainly prefer that they weren't on the books. They are, though, and I have to deal with them although I think their ickiness is overrated. It's generally a matter of being organized and perhaps a little creative, so I don't think you'll have a problem. I have a couple links (on another computer, of course) that I'll PM you in the next...
Quote: Originally Posted by mandib50 kids are expected to read by the time they leave kindergarten where i live. i don't get it myself, i think it's waaaay to early considering that the vast majority of 3 and 4 year olds are NOT ready to read or write. some, but i'd say it's a pretty small minority. whatever happened to kids being kids? or maybe i'm just jealous cuz 7 seems to be the age in my house where my kids start reading I'm not...
I agree that you would be well advised to avoid "curricula" per se with little ones. However, that doesn't mean that you need to be cast adrift if you're feeling like you want a little more guidance with regards to activities and organization. Sometimes all we need is a little push to open up our imaginations! I've enjoyed the Everything for Winter/Fall/Spring books very, very much. They have all kinds of songs, activities, games, recipes, crafts and so on geared for...
I can see it. Hope you can, too, soon.
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