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Posts by msjd123

Quote: Originally Posted by nd_deadhead I am the primary breadwinner in our house while my DH is in grad school, so I got good disability insurance that starts paying right away (disability through work doesn't kick in for several weeks). The insuance is $20/month - well worth it! We have disability insurance, too, both short-term and long-term, but it's far more expensive than that; maybe I should shop around. Thanks for all the feedback! ...
Quote: Originally Posted by nd_deadhead You are SO right about child care expenses! This is one area where I never skimped either. Are you taking advantage of a flexible spending program to pay for your child care with pre-tax dollars? YES! I'm actually thinking of not contributing next year, though, because we've had nothing but hassles from the company that holds the money for us, so we're constantly short. It is now nearly mid-August and...
Quote: Originally Posted by TiredX2 Well, since you mention that you contribute to a ROTH, this is my opionion: You can take out contributions to a ROTH, penalty free, at any time. So, I would go ahead and keep doing retirement contributions and keep the fact in the back of my mind that in a *true* emergency I could always take out my Roth contributions. But if you don't need it, it is set aside for retirement. Knowing me, though, we'd have...
Quote: Originally Posted by nd_deadhead How old are you? It seems to me that once your student loan is paid off, that amount can go into retirement saving. Car payment is a wash, because when you stop making the payment, you'll want to keep saving that amount for the next car. Depending on your age, I think cutting back (not eliminating) some retirement for a year or two while you build up an e-fund is not a bad idea, especially if you can roll the...
I've read quite a few articles lately that recommend you halt or put off retirement contributions until you have a 3-6 month emergency fund in place. Then there are a whole bunch of articles and experts who don't deny that an emergency fund is crucial, but who suggest you continue retirement contributions (because of the tax breaks, investment opportunity, value of compounding, etc.) while you build up an emergency fund more slowly. I have always gone along with the...
Quote: Originally Posted by Belleweather I never have felt like I need to be earning a certian amount of money for it to be "worth it" for me to work -- there are other ways to measure the worth of my work life than the money I'm bringing in. So the way we approached budgeting for child care has been to look at how much unallocated money we have in the budget (after fixed expenses + food, basically) and figure we could spend most of that on childcare...
If you're still open to other options, I would strongly recommend taking a close look at a Nissan Versa hatchback. We got one a few months ago, and WOW, that thing is huge inside! It has a shocking amount of space in the back for the kids, even for 3 in car seats.
Quote: Originally Posted by boatbaby I hope this is a safe place to say this... ...lately I am so grateful for my decision to have an only! Between reading posts right here on MDC and hearing/ seeing my real life friends with 2+ kids it seems like everyone I know is miserable coping with the day to day of juggling more than one kid. And I find as DS gets older and easier I am just loving life more and more. The hard part is relating. I am looking...
Quote: Originally Posted by llamalluv This is what you argue about? Well....you are correct. YOU contribute 15% to your retirement, but are saving 23%. The word contribute has a specific definition and the employer match does not meet that definition: Contribute: To give or supply in common with others; give to a common fund or for a common purpose. *snort!* You know, we fought like dogs when were kids, but now... not so much. DH...
My brother and I were talking about job benefits and investing, and we disagreed on how to calculate the following situation: DH and I are both teachers, so 8% of our salary automatically goes toward the state teachers' retirement system (STRS) -- that's our defined-benefit pension. (We don't pay into and won't be eligible for Social Security; STRS is that entity for us, and mercifully, it's much more reliable.) The district we work for kicks in another 8%. On...
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