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Posts by MidwifeErika

You bring up a very interesting point re:breech as it may play into those numbers. I hope you do not feel like i am trying to explain it away. I am not. Really. 
The number of births does matter, as does a lot of other factors. Are the assistants coming totally green and inexperienced students? Or are they other midwives? Are these numbers as primary midwife or are they including doula births? How do they practice and which one do you feel like is more competent and matches best with you? To me, the number would matter, but it is not the only thing that matters. I know midwives with soooooooo much experience, but who have a very...
 But worse outcomes than when there is a complication and care is transported would be when there is a complication and care is NOT transported. Most of the stories I have read have been the exact opposite of what you describe. Especially the stories that have made national news. 
It makes sense to me in that transports that are appropriate and timely probably resulted in wonderful outcomes and I would bet very, very, very few of those babies died. So, if the intended place of birth was home, the midwife transported appropriately for, say, thick meconium, baby was born healthy in the hospital, that outcome would be recorded as a hospital birth. If midwives are transporting 10-15% of the time and those outcomes are great, it reduces the total number...
It is also very possible that many of those midwives were working in states in which they are not allowed by their license (or lack of licensing) to give anti-hemorrhagic meds. That is always a consideration for women when making a decision about homebirth and midwives.... can their midwife give meds? If not, what is the plan? Herbs? Bimanual compression? While we don't know details of this issue, my hope would be that the midwives who did not give medications got the...
I don't know what country you live in when you say "here," so I might be totally off base by guessing Canada? Anyhow, I know midwives, CPMs, who have moved to Canada and successfully completed a short bridging program that allowed them to become registered midwives in Canada. They did not have to start over from scratch at all, their education and experience was considered adequate. 
 Granted that I have only been involved in entering in statistics since 2007, but the clients had to be enrolled prior to their due date or it didn't count. Of course, the actual statistics of what happened at the birth would be sent in after the 6 week visit, once care was complete and you had outcomes to report, but the woman was enrolled during pregnancy. I guess I can't speak to if Barb's births even got counted in the statistics if she was not enrolling her clients...
One more thing that dawned on me while playing with the CDC wonder numbers..... intrapartum fetal deaths are not included in the infant death numbers. Is there somewhere else on that site that has that number? 
When playing with the CDC numbers, I found a hospital death rate more than double what she found for her blog when using criteria of white, full term, all states, etc. I tried to make it as low risk as possible while choosing hospital as the location, but the numbers I got were .8something vs. .38 that is being talked about in the blog post. (and I hesitate to even write this because I am certain it is going to lead to me being called all sorts of names, having my brain...
I lived in Appleton for a long time and can maybe help. My experience with these midwives is really through me being a midwifery student rather than a client. I will only respond about the midwives that I know :)   The midwives I have seen in action the most often were Stacy Vandeput and Jill Coulter. I think they are both great. I was at a birth as a doula once in which Pam Rhodes was the assisting midwife and she was really lovely, too! I never made it out to any...
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