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Posts by karne

OP, the fine line you're walking here is debating whether the behavior is as serious as it really is, and debating whether to "force" treatment, when the reality is that your dd's behavior is putting her in a place of great vulnerability to life threatening harm.  At some point the choice of whether to move on this is going to be out of your hands.   This sounds very strong, but I would be talking with a therapist about whether your dd is currently safe being out in...
making fun of kids is definitely not cool.   who's a "special snowflake kid"?  wha...?  Maybe I just don't understand?   ETA: I'll bet that if we change the term to Special Snowflake Parenting we'll all be laughing so hard we'll be holding our sides.
    I think the term "idiot adults who make fun of kids and use that to snark parents" is hilarious, but that might just be me.      
Helicopter parenting.......pretty obvious.  Probably was one myself with my first child, but not by the time my second came around!   The snowflake thing.....sure, it gets used for kids behaving poorly, not corrected by their parents or being asked to respect normal rules of behavior.  I've seen it used to describe children, not parents, who are gifted and require some sort of advancement or differentiation.  
Why do you ask?
Me too....always had a book, sometimes a classic, sometimes trash.  I think my generation was more apt to carry around a book because 1. no video, handheld games, etc., and 2. as far as I remember no one was really paying attention to buying workbooks or enrichment materials....it was just a different time.     I have to say, I would not be happy to be paying private tuition and having to supply workbooks for my kid.  I get it because we left a private school that was...
One more suggestion---would an independent project that was longer term in nature, and could be worked on in pieces, ie down time as she waits, be an option?  To me, that might be more worthwhile than worksheets because it would seem less like busy work, and more like it has a purpose, and could be engaging.  My own experience is that giving an opportunity to go deeper into a topic is often a good option.        
We were in a store today and my ds was, for some odd reason, telling the sales clerk that he hadn't had soda until he was 9 y/o.  I think it was 8, but the reality is that we just don't have a lot of soda around, so it never came up as a choice.  I don't forbid it...my kids now adore root beer floats, but the reaction was sort of funny from the clerk.  My kids are old enough that I could care less what anyone thinks, and I don't think an occ. 'treat" from someone is...
Barnes and Noble had some workbooks that were targeted toward the gifted/high achieving student-I think they may have been discussed in this forum.  Something along the lines of, for example, math for gifted 4th graders.  I've been meaning to check them out.   Does your school subscribe to any on line resources that your dd could do while she waits for her classmates to finish her work?  That might be slightly more engaging than a steady diet of workbooks.   Does...
Meet with the teacher and principal. In fact, I'd involve the guidance counselor as well. It sounds like your dd needs a behavior plan, and losing recess continually is not step one of a behavior plan.  FWIW, in some places I believe it is not actually legal to take away recess, and other states seem to be doing away with it.  I frankly think it's a very misguided view of the need children have for unrestricted movement during the course of the school day.  It's...
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