or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by mrmansmama

Bekka,  we thought of this recently.  We tend toward low blood sugar in my family, so I started trying to pay attention to giving him protein every few hours.  The jury is still out on whether it is making a significant difference.
Thanks deminc.  I agree that it isn't about the object. It is whatever he associates with that object.  Your story about the blow up with your son is familiar.  We have had some similar things happen.  One night he totally freaked out at bed time... wouldn't put on his pajamas, wouldn't brush his teeth, starting screaming at me and flailing like I hadn't seen him do in 2 years.  Well, after much calming him down and talking, it turned out he had heard some say earlier in...
Great ideas.  I have thought about trying to take pictures of things for him to keep.  I guess I just can't figure it out.  When he's sobbing like his heart is broke about something, I just can't help but think 'this isn't right'.  I just feel like it is so hard for him to be happy.  Everything is a big deal, everything is taken to heart.    He is intense with a capital I.  I worry that if we can't help him fix these things now, he is going to be an unhappy adult.  I was...
He is almost 7.  He has a strong reaction almost always when it involves getting rid of something.  Sometimes he can be talked into it.  This latest example was unique because when it happened we really had no idea what was going on.  We sold the chair weeks ago and he knew about it at the time and was fine.  I guess he was making a connection between us rocking him to sleep as a baby and that chair.  He tends to be very sentimental and has a hard time with change.
Just looking for some insight, as my son is really worrying me.  He has always been 'intense' emotionally in a variety of ways, but I have become increasingly concerned about his attachment to objects.  For example, tonight we were talking about something and DH said something about DS liking to be rocked to sleep when he was a baby.  Out of nowhere, DS starts to cry and say 'stop talking about me".  I said, "Why, what is upsetting you?".  He says, "It makes me sad to...
Quote: Profoundly gifted is the 99.9th percentile on an IQ test and, on modern tests, that number is much lower than it was on older tests. Thus, the 145 criterian . I always find the scoring very confusing. So many different tests with scores that mean different things. When I look at the 'Ruf's Levels' stuff, I see my son mostly in level 4, with some level 3. I just looked back at it again and I see that both level 4 and 5 are in the 99th...
tarasam: Thank you for your reply. Do you mind if I ask what the testing cost you?
The services are not specifically for home schoolers, they are for anyone. However, I thought it may serve as a good support system since we will be on our own and will not have any services that may be offered by the school. Here is the link: http://www.davidsongifted.org/youngscholars/
I am curious about the Davidson Young Scholars program. My son is now 4.5 yrs and it starts at 5yrs. We are planning to home school, so I was thinking that the support services they offer may be really helpful. However, getting in requires testing. I would not otherwise do testing, so if we did it would be only for this program. I am looking for input from anyone whose child is in the program. Do you find the resources offered very helpful? Of course, I'm not even...
We like to go to Barnes and Noble. We walk around looking and reading a bit and then sit in the cafe part and have a coffee and a treat of some kind and talk. A good at home date on a friday night is to make a "fun" dinner just for us after the kids are in bed. Something like a bunch of appetizer things (wings, egg rolls, etc.). We eat in on tray tables and watch a movie. Oh, and there has to be ice cream.
New Posts  All Forums: