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Posts by cyclamen

 They check for hypoxia by testing the infant's blood gas concentration.  Usually this is done after birth using the cord blood, but I have heard of them doing it with a nick to the scalp during birth too, perhaps if they can't get the heart rate.  Most commonly, they follow the baby's heart rate.  Babies who have a normal heart tracing are almost always fine.  Babies with an abnormal heart tracing in a particular pattern called late decelerations are at risk for hypoxia....
I think there is a thread on here discussing that article already, will see if I can find it.
Is it this one?  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/811222
 I second the recommendation for BFW.  Also, there is a new book out called A Good Birth that I have read excerpts of that I think might be useful to you. I am a huge proponent of listening to ourselves and also to our fears.  Fear is our body's way of telling us something is VERY IMPORTANT to us.  I wouldn't think of it as a personal failure of bravery or anything, but just your own self communicating with you.  The reality is we cannot see into the future, so we have to...
I have to comment about the "other cultures see baby crying in [x particular way]."  That is an awfully broad statement to make.  I suspect the observers' statement says as much it not more about themselves than it does about the observed culture.   Second of all, I was raised in a bubble of high context culture (within a larger "mainstream" of low context culture) and I was taught to carefully observe my child in order to see what she needed and provide it before she...
 I wish I could like this post a hundred times.   A parent's job is to support children in developing the skills they need to thrive in the culture they are growing up in.  When I live, a certain amount of individuationin adults is expected and necessary.  I support my kid in developing the skills she needs to separate from me and have her own feelings and boundaries.  For many families the separation is a necessary part of sustaining the family.  There are many gentle...
Kids will cry to express discomfort.  This is new, this is different, this is scary.  As long as there are caring adults ready to support them in the transition and in developing skills to deal with the change, this is an opportunity for them to learn and grow.  It's ok to be sad, it's ok to cry, and it's ok to be comforted by someone other than mom.  Then it's ok to run off and play!  This is part of how they will learn that they can handle the world.
Definitely bring it up with your doctor.  It can be normal but it can also be a food intolerance issue.  DD1 had this and combined with her dropping off the growth chart we discovered she was gluten intolerant at 15 months.  She went from having whole chunks of food in her poop, diarrhea and constipation, to normal poops in about two weeks after we took gluten out of her diet.  If there are other warning signs your ped may want to do a blood test.  Blood test does not work...
I find it helps not thinking about what other people had to deal with or whether they are justified in feeling however they feel because a lot of time I think it's me trying to figure out if I am justified in feeling what I feel.  If what happened to me was worse or better than what happened to someone else.  So it's easier if I just focus on what happened to me and say, "well, what happened was crappy, it sucked, and it's ok that I am angry."  I'm allowed to be upset...
Your pelvis is covered by muscle and fascia, and a c-section is into the uterus, which is a muscle, so an OB could not have directly seen your pelvis from the inside.  He might have seen the outlet of the uterus though, which might follow the pelvic shape.  That might be a good thing to ask either your midwife or your old OB (probably a better question for an OB who does c-sections).  He might have palpated it from the outside. Or he might have said that because pelvic...
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