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Posts by erika

My 6-1/2 yo dd has also been making "slow" reading progress, in contrast with her incredible oral vocabulary and grammar (at age 4 she was correcting people who used lay/lie or who/whom incorrectly). I assumed that she would just learn reading by herself (as I had), but we are finding it a little more challenging than that. She gets bored and frustrated easily when we work on reading. Yet she desperately wants to be able to read, and is irritated that she can't yet. ...
Even if your neice has a "learning disability", she may not need any "special services". I have a friend whose 4 unschooled children were all "learning disabled". They all learned to read around the age of 12, and went straight to adult-level reading. The oldest is now 17, and is making straight A's in her community college classes in preparation for a 4-year college. So even if your neice takes a few more years to get reading, it doesn't mean that she will not be able...
I work full-time with a "flexible" schedule, but I still have to put in face-time nearly every day. I go in at 6:30am, and play with my departure time so that on some days I come home at lunch time and do an hour at night, and on one or two days I work really late -- and I often try to get 4-6 hours of work done over the weekend. DH is with the kids, but then when I come home, he goes to work (home-based, totally flexible, 20-40 hrs/week). Although he always breaks at...
Well, I'm working full time now and dh is hsing and I really miss it. I try to leave work early some days and do cuisinaire rods on the weekends and all sorts of things to try to bring back the feeling of last year. But it's just not the same. Oh, woe. And I even have the most interesting job I've ever held - the kind of job where you say, well, if I had to work this would be the job. But it doesn't hold a candle to hsing my dds. -e
it's interesting to learn about your experience. my dd sounds similar, and we are sometimes tempted to put her in school to get a break from the intensity. she turns 6 in a few weeks, and it was helpful to learn that she should be settled by 8...
We've had three-1/2 years of Suzuki violin (since dd was 34 months old), and it all boils down to the teacher. We had to fire our first teacher who almost destroyed any love of music in dd AND me. [how many days did you practice? seven? good. how many days did you listen to the tape? only three? well, you don't get a sticker until you practice AND listen all seven days.] Our second teacher was wonderful, but our third teacher (we moved to another state) is...
as for your husband's dream - it may still be able to happen. this year I am working full time (yikes) and my husband is staying home with the kids. because my work schedule is flexible, we are planning to give him 20 hours a week to work on his book and start up free-lance writing. so some day you may be able to make it work, but it may mean that his business will have to start more slowly than he wants, and that he'll have to take over most of the household...
I'm sorry that I can't tell you anything about Calvert, but Five in a Row or Before Five in a Row might also be a nice place to start with your son. My experience has been that it can take a couple of false starts before you figure out how your child likes to do homeschooling. Five in a Row is nice because it is structured, but very loosely so - you can spend anywhere from 30 minutes to 2 hours/day on it. It is also very inexpensive (about $25 for each volume of about...
It seems that most of the catalogs are Christian-based, so I just try to get several opinions on materials before I buy them. I just came across www.resourcefulhomeschooler.com which does not seem Christian and has nice descriptions of all their stuff, but I haven't ordered anything from them yet so I can't tell you anything about customer service, etc. My big suggestion is to start out slowly. Give yourself a budget and stick to it. There's a lot of stuff that...
if your policy allows you to choose any provider (i.e. no network restrictions or HMO) and if they cover physicians and nurses, they will also cover CNMs and it doesn't matter where the services are performed. Don't even tell them it's a homebirth - it doesn't matter. lay midwives, on the other hand, are often not covered, so start saving now. states with licenses for lay midwives may have other arrangements. i have had 2 homebirths with CNM with Blue Cross of...
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