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Posts by maxymum

I am sorry about your son's seizures. The EEG can show them lots of info, seizure or no seizure. They can show small seizures that aren't seen, where they are coming from, where they are going to, what type, electrical slowing in recently seized areas, patterns that may necessitate other testing... They are non-invasive and can be very helpful. Fwiw, I have always held and nursed my dd for her EEGs, switching boobs when they need to access the other side of her head
I don't think Keppra has a temp issue??? It is kind of a pain, the whole mail-order thing but they always sent me a HUGE bottle compared to the tiny amount from our local pharm. The price was also much more affordable! When we switched to mail-order, they started sending us the (new) generic form of Keppra, a big issue for my dd. If you need the real thing, make sure your dr specifically notes that in the prescription. Usually, ime, if you run our faster than it...
My daughter Charlotte (Dravet Syndrome) http://charlotteswebpaige.blogspot.com/ was on Keppra for years, starting at 6 months old. We saw some mild side effects at high doses ("Kepprage" and the usual AED fatigue/dizziness/sleeplessness) but Keppra seems to cause little to to no problems for most people, compared to many of the other AEDs we have tried. It is a one of the newer drugs which, I am told, is why it is not indicated for young children, infants, just hasn't...
Charlotte takes many many medications. I've found the valproic acid (syrup) easier to administer, and anything else in a syringe for that matter! If it comes in a tablet or powder, I grind it up, put it in liquid and syringe it into her cheek pouch, supplements too. I also find that she feeds off of MY reluctance so I have to "gear up" and put on my super happy face. I talk her through each med, saying their names and what each med does for her, and we smile and joke...
I also find that planning out the day in advance helps. I let the kids choose most of the activities, giving them a couple options each day. Mine have at least one outing a day, meeting up with their playmates and usually a picnic. We hike or bike in the mornings after breakfast, reading time (first thing in the am, they pick out their books for the day), cooking/baking meals together, an art project (paint, paper, glue, scissors, stickers, clay), creative building...
My son was 2 when my twins were born. Husband away, no family nearby... One word? Babywearing. I could not have survived without my trusty wraps (mei tais, buckle carriers, pouches, onbus ) I got out AT LEAST for a walk each day. Even though it can seem like a hassle, it does wonders for your sanity. It totally gets better and better, you are probably just in a really challenging time. Hang in there!
Yes! SO worth it, can't say enough good things Please find one, you won't regret it.
We are homeschoolers, too. My oldest is 5 and my nursing twins are 2.5, you just have to plan a bit more
we did both. two little seats for each girl and two that attach to the toilet. the small ones got old quick and it was such a chore to clean them out. we now only use the toilet attachment. i think it depends upon the child as some have a fear of the big toilet/falling in.
i'm sorry you are going through such a challenging time mama! i don't have any input on your son's possible diagnoses, sorry. i just wanted to say that i think things are less challenging, imo, when you have lots and lots of symptoms and no idea what is going on, desperate for a diagnosis vs. a typical child and suddenly, WHAM, a really difficult diagnosis allofasudden. that didn't come out right, not trying to "compare" anybody's challenges just that, for me, it...
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