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Posts by KAT2006

I highly suggest doing extensive research before skipping the metabolic screen "PKU" test. It started with just pku but has now expanded to testing for 30-60 different metabolic problems (depending on your state). Almost all babies with metabolic problems have no prior family history and are born perfect and healthy (because the mother is doing all the work). Left untreated by the time the baby shows the first symptoms that the mom can notice the repercussions can be...
Just my two cents...Aspiration is aspiration, it really stinks! Whether it is amniotic fluid, blood, or meconium, the lungs don't like anything in there. It's like a paper cut, the day you get it you look down and say..oh I got a paper cut. The next day you wake up and it's red, inflamed, sore. The lungs respond the same way with the same inflammation process, needing support with breathing, antibiotics, nutrition though IV's and milk, and time to heal. The aspiration is...
Just a little fyi, babies that qualify for cooling MUST start the cooling process by 6 hours old. After the 6 hour mark there is no benefit and the cooling process will actually be more detrimental. Sending good thoughts! :) Kat
Mama, I am a NICU RN and just wanted to say that oomphaloceles are not always associated with other problems. I have seen many,many babies who just have that single problem. After you find out more information about your babies you may want to look into how your different hospitals handle oomphaloceles. There is a newer technique called "paint and wait" that we have seen in my hospital that can work better for the large O's. It involves painting the oomphalocele with...
I am a NICU nurse in one of the biggest NICU's on the east coast. And 34 weeks is really, really early to be confident in their lung development. Yes, some babies are okay, but really MOST need help from a nasal cannula to a ventilator in some instances. Surfactant production is usually done by about 36 weeks, which is why term is considered 37. Respiratory distress syndrome (preemie lungs) needs quick attention, the babies that have interventions quickly after birth do...
You sound like such a wonderful mommy...already making great decisions for your little one. I just wanted to add one thing: these "gut" babies are usually the ones that all NICU nurses hope the mom's choose to pump/breastfeed. Their intestines are so sensitive and breastmilk is SO MUCH better for them. So rest, sleep, visit, kangaroo, drink, and pump.....you shouldn't meet ANY resistance towards using EBM. Ask about using your own bottles (when it looks like Faith is...
Wow, you are luck to not only have private rooms but 24 hour rooming in. That will give you lots of time to bond with Faith. Gastrochesis babies are usually NPO for weeks after birth. Hopefully you get a primary closure (just one surgery to get it all back in). These babies are very hungry and fussy since they cannot eat and a pacifier is usually given to them to help keep them happy as well as to make sure they do not develop an oral aversion. Once they are able to start...
Lung surfactant is just becoming complete around 36 weeks. 35 weekers can be just fine with some good labor hormones, but sometimes those babies need some help breathing. (Especially little white boys) Below 35 weeks there is a very good chance that they will need some kind of oxygen support. I don't know the statistics off hand...but I would definitely say greater than 60% of our 34 weekers need a little o2 support at least through transition. I work in one of the...
ANY baby can get NEC. The more premature the baby is, the greater the risk. Breastmilk does cut down on that risk substantially, I always tell my NICU mom's it is "the greatest gift" to their baby. However, the preemie's gut is not supposed to have to do the work of digesting/absorbing anything yet and is very suceptible to injury. I work in a huge NICU with low NEC rates (the national rate is about 8%), but it does happen, even to babies who have been on straight...
From what I have read and seen in the NICU (accreta/precreda babies are often born early) that the biggest risk factor is getting pregnant quickly after having a C/S or any uterine surery. Within the first 6 months or so. Luckily, it's very rare, I don't know what the percentage is. A true accreta/precreta mom needs an automatic C/S NOT for the babies sake.....but to stop the mom from bleeding out after delivery. The placenta doesn't pull away from the side of the uterus...
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