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Posts by Jennifer Z

I have one child that has that constant hunger for interaction. I think the trick is to just keep in eyeshot of them as much as practical. Brainstorm projects for her to do and set her up at the kitchen table (or workspace that is the center of what you are doing) so that she can get the feedback she is wanting. You might consider some virtual school curriculum or online educational games that are her level (brainpop, things like that) where there are more structured...
I stacked them up, took a picture, then wrote "1", "2", "3"..."10" on the picture over each corresponding rod and hung the picture high up so that it was behind them when I sat across from them at the table. That way I could see it to reference it but it wasn't in their direct line of sight.
Quote: Originally Posted by Lillian J Although your comment got me to chuckling and wondering whether someone hadn't actually come up with one, so I googled "learn to walk lessons," and actually did find an article about "How to "Teach" a Baby to Walk." It just involved playful activities, but yes, there really are notions of that sort of thing. I didn't look any further, so I don't know what else is out there... Lillian There is a whole...
Kansas would be green on that map except that you have to register your homeschool ONE time, and can do it online. It takes about 3 minutes...you tell the the "name of the school" (which you make up) and the names and ages of the students. Every time you have a kid hit compulsory age (7yo for regular ed students, 3yo for SpEd students), you add them to the student list (a minute or so on the computer). Once you have spent a few minutes on the computer, you never have to...
Quote: Originally Posted by Mama_Leah We live in VA and operate under the Religious Exemption clause which exempts us from any government interference. So, if you claim you are homeschooling for religious reasons (we aren't, but we are Christian and we homeschool, so it isn't a complete fabrication), you don't have to be under an umbrella school or anything? Do you know if it changes if your student is special needs?
I agree with the PP, just don't allow her to engage in that conversation. If everybody on this earth were reasonable, there wouldn't be two political parties. As far as the local homeschooling group goes, you might consider starting your own list for "Independent Homeschoolers". I live in Kansas, a state so red they "call it" for the republican side before the voting starts. There are liberals here, but they are pretty used to being the minority and just rolling...
A really good math, largely because it is exploritory and foundational rather than workbook-like is Miquon Math. They can use the cuisinaire rods to build with too, so it is a toy and tool in one, where they learn number relationships. http://www.rainbowresource.com/produ...5402251-703772 (they also come in plastic, which is cheaper and still good quality) It is really nice for us because it is easier to make math more like play, and considering how difficult some...
The teacher's manual was helpful to me because I have a learner with motor planning issues, so the details helped me. I don't think it is essential for most learners though. See if somebody in your local homeschool group has one you can flip through (or if you have a b&m store that sells them), that might be enough.
I didn't read the whole thread, but as the parent of a SN learner who tried K12 this school year, I was in the same position earlier this year. I felt guilty about it not working well, but finally just unenrolled him. The amount of scaffolding I had to do was crazy, far more work than just getting him stuff that actually targeted his learning style and addressed is deficits more effectively. There were bits and pieces of K12 that were good, but as a whole, it was a huge...
I am not a huge fan of HSLDA, but they would be the first people I called if I was up against the wall like that.
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